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[ 2019.07.22 ]

Will the U.S. Be a Dystopian Hellscape in 2100 if Emissions Keep Rising?

The US is on a path to an unrecognizably hot future. Here’s what that looks like and how to change course.

Kristy Dahl, Senior Climate Scientist | Union of Concerned Scientists

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[ 2019.07.22 ]

For a Brief Moment in Every NASA Mission, Astronauts Become Designers

The surprisingly whimsical art of the space patch

Emily Ludolph | AIGA Eye on Design

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[ 2019.07.16 ]

ELLIS AND HITCH REUNITE FOR THE DARK KNIGHT’S 80TH ANNIVERSARY

Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch, one of the most legendary creative partnerships in modern comic book history, reunite for THE BATMAN’S GRAVE, a twelve-issue monthly DC maxi-series about life, death and the questions most are too afraid to ask.

via WARREN ELLIS LTD

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[ 2019.07.15 ]

EPA Approves Bee-Killing Pesticide After U.S. Quits Tracking Vanishing Hives

The EPA has dropped restrictions on the use of a powerful pesticide known to be particularly lethal to honeybees for some 190 million acres of US cropland. The action came just days after the US Department of Agriculture revealed it had stopped tracking rapidly vanishing honeybee colonies.

Mary Papenfuss | HuffPost

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[ 2019.07.14 ]

First image of Einstein's 'spooky' particle entanglement

Scientists have captured the first ever image of a phenomenon which Albert Einstein once described as "spooky action at a distance".

BBC News

See the Image

[ 2019.07.13 ]

Interactive Map of UFO Sightings

This map is based on data from the National UFO Reporting Center. It includes over 90,000 reports of UFO sightings dating as far back as 1905. Each circle on the map corresponds to a reported UFO, with the size representing the number of UFO reports received. For any UFO reported by at least two people, details of all sightings are available by clicking on the circle.

Created by Max Galka

Visit the UFO Sightings Map

[ 2019.07.09 ]

Inside Starshot, the audacious plan to shoot tiny ships to Alpha Centauri

Starshot wants to build the world’s most powerful laser and aim it at the closest star. What could go wrong?

Kate Greene | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.07.04 ]

Five schemes for cheaper space launches—and five cautionary tales

Spaceplanes, giant rockets, tethers and catapults.

Konstantin Kakaes | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.07.02 ]

Meet Silicon Valley's UFO Hunters

A small group of venture capitalists and technologists believe that humans can capture and reverse-engineer UFOs — and that trying to do so might be a good investment.

MJ Banias | Motherboard

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[ 2019.06.30 ]

A new art and apparel brand — Club Kiddo

Dedicated to celebrating the awesome, the everyday and the imaginary.

A gender-neutral, modern kids brand — inspired by kiddos, for kiddos.

Visit Clubkiddo.co

[ 2019.06.21 ]

NYC Synth Duo Ghost Cop Showcase Their Love with 70s and 80s Horror in “ENHANCE”

NYC Synth duo Ghost Cop are back with another fantastic video from their debut LP released last November, One Weird Trick.

via POST-PUNK.COM

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[ 2019.06.17 ]

DRONEGOD$.mov

"Goodbye friends, see you on the other side."

via DRONEGOD$ YouTube

*from the pages of Infinite Detail

Watch the Video

[ 2019.06.12 ]

Sightings of these rare, shimmering clouds on the edge of space are on the rise. No one knows why.

They form 50 miles up, in a region of the atmosphere called the mesosphere. All of our weather-producing clouds live far lower — generally less than 50,000 feet — in the troposphere.

Sightings have been pouring in from the western half of the nation.

Matthew Cappucci | The Washington Post

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[ 2019.06.11 ]

New Book - Soviet Logos: Lost Marks of the Utopia

Even if thousands of logos were created in the USSR only a very small part of them managed to survive until our days. Designed by professionals of various specialties, these fine graphic creations quickly became forgotten because of the turbulent fall of the Soviet Union. This monograph aims to rediscover the unrighteously forgotten logos and to introduce them into the global design context.

via Soviet Logos

Buy the Book

[ 2019.06.09 ]

NASA Opens International Space Station to New Commercial Opportunities, Private Astronauts

NASA is opening the International Space Station for commercial business so U.S. industry innovation and ingenuity can accelerate a thriving commercial economy in low-Earth orbit.

Press Release | NASA

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[ 2019.06.06 ]

Space weather affects your daily life. It’s time to start paying attention.

Meet the space-weather forecaster leading the charge to help us understand solar flares and geomagnetic storms before it’s too late.

Erin Winick | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.06.04 ]

The Anthropocene epoch: have we entered a new phase of planetary history?

Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history.

Nicola Davison | The Guardian

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[ 2019.06.04 ]

SpaceX beginning to tackle some of the big challenges for a Mars journey

SpaceX realizes that getting to Mars will require a lot of help. NASA and the academic community have begun to step up and help one of the most ambitious undertakings of our times.

Ben Pearson | Ars Technica

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[ 2019.06.04 ]

For All Mankind — Official First Look Trailer

What if the space race had never ended? Watch an official first look at For All Mankind, an Apple Original drama series coming this Fall to Apple TV+.

via Apple TV YouTube

Watch the Trailer

[ 2019.06.04 ]

New Report Suggests ‘High Likelihood of Human Civilization Coming to an End’ in 2050

A harrowing scenario analysis of how human civilization might collapse in coming decades due to climate change has been endorsed by a former Australian defense chief and senior royal navy commander.

Nafeez Ahmed | Vice

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[ 2019.05.30 ]

NASA is Using This Underwater Lab to Train Astronauts for the Moon

This summer, NASA astronauts will join an international diving crew in a special underwater laboratory under the Atlantic to prepare astronauts for the harsh environment of space as well as the lunar and Martian surfaces.

Victor Tangermann | Futurism

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[ 2019.05.23 ]

OFFF 2019 Open Film ARXIV by Mill+

Mill+ Director Ilya Abulkhanov opened Offf Barcelona 2019 with the debut of his sci-fi short film ‘ARXIV’. ARXIV (pronounced ‘archive’) is an immersive sci-fi family drama is set in two time frames: the deep future, that is left with no future, and the near future, that will bring about the eventual dystopian collapse of society. Protagonist Lew Aron survives both time frames and is set to discover a potential outlet to confront his innermost desire, or what’s left of it.

via OFFF Festival Vimeo

Watch the Film

[ 2019.05.23 ]

Terminator: Dark Fate - Official Teaser Trailer

Welcome to the day after Judgment Day. Producer James Cameron returns with director Tim Miller for Terminator: Dark Fate. In theatres 11.1.19.

via Paramount Pictures YouTube

Watch the Trailer

[ 2019.05.17 ]

WILDCATS with Ramon Villalobos & Tamra Bonvillain for DC Comics

Warren Ellis to write a six-issue WILDCATS series for DC as part of the Wildstorm pop-up imprint, with artist team Ramon Villalobos and Tamra Bonvillain.

via Warren Ellis Ltd.

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[ 2019.05.13 ]

Watch Future Mars Settlers Ride a Space Elevator in This 'Aniara' Sci-Fi Film Clip

Watch a clip and the official trailer for "Aniara", as well as check out alternate posters for the film. The movie debuts in select theaters May 17.

Elizabeth Howell | Space.com

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[ 2019.05.12 ]

The 1968 sci-fi that spookily predicted today

In the first of BBC Culture’s new series on fiction that predicted the future, Hephzibah Anderson looks at the work of John Brunner, whose vision of 2010 was eerily accurate.

Hephzibah Anderson | BBC

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[ 2019.05.12 ]

Ancient ritual bundle contained multiple psychotropic plants

A thousand years ago, Native Americans in South America used multiple psychotropic plants—possibly simultaneously—to induce hallucinations and altered consciousness, according to an international team of anthropologists.

via Phys.org

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[ 2019.05.10 ]

Club for the Future

This club is a way to connect young people who love our home planet, who believe in the power of human ingenuity and the abundance of space, and who are unshakably optimistic about the future. We welcome students, educators, and fans of the future to join a worldwide community of dreamers sponsored by Blue Origin, builders of reusable rockets and roads to space.

Visit clubforfuture.org

[ 2019.05.10 ]

Introducing Blue Moon

Blue Moon is a flexible lander delivering a wide variety of small, medium and large payloads to the lunar surface. Its capability to provide precise and soft landings will enable a sustained human presence on the Moon.

via Blue Origin YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2019.05.07 ]

Mad Scientist Laboratory… Forecasting the Future of Warfare

The Mad Scientist Laboratory blog is a marketplace of ideas about the future of our society, work, and conflict.

Mad Scientist is a U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) initiative.

Visit the Blog

[ 2019.05.06 ]

Nature’s Dangerous Decline ‘Unprecedented’; Species Extinction Rates ‘Accelerating’

Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.

Press Release | IPBES

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[ 2019.05.06 ]

Future Relics: AirPods Are a Tragedy

Apple claims that AirPods are building a “wireless future.” Many people think they're a symbol of disposable wealth. The truth is bleaker.

Caroline Haskens | Motherboard

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[ 2019.05.06 ]

Check out the Petersen Automotive Museum’s fantastic exhibit of sci-fi cars

Last week, the Petersen Automotive Museum of Los Angeles opened a massive new exhibit: Hollywood Dream Machines: Vehicles of Science Fiction and Fantasy, which includes more than 50 vehicles from throughout science fiction movie history, along with other props and memorabilia.

Andrew Liptak | The Verge

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[ 2019.05.03 ]

Deep Civilization

The long view of humanity — a series that aims to stand back from the news cycle and widen the lens of our current place in time.

BBC Future

See the Articles

[ 2019.05.03 ]

Center for PostNatural History

"That was then. This is now."

The Center for PostNatural History is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge relating to the complex interplay between culture, nature, and biotechnology. Our mission is to acquire, interpret, and provide access to a collection of living, preserved, and documented organisms of postnatural origin.

Visit the Website

[ 2019.05.03 ]

Romania's witches harness the powers of the web

“It’s not the phone or Facebook that are doing the magic. It’s the words that we’re saying, the rituals that we’re doing and it’s enough to look each other in the eye for the ritual to work.”

The power of the Internet has allowed Romania’s busy witch community to gradually migrate their ancient practices onto the Web.

Emily Wither | Reuters

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[ 2019.05.01 ]

New Russian ‘drone mothership’ submarine launched

Russian media reported that the 184 m-long submarine is designed to operate six Poseidon weapons and it is also believed to have an underwater dock beneath its hull to allow the launch of mini-submarines and multimission UUVs.

Tim Ripley | Jane's Defence Weekly

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[ 2019.05.01 ]

My Famicase Exhibition

"My Family Exhibition" started in 2005 as an exhibition event where designers and artists create labels for game cartridges. The exhibition started with 23 volunteers who are related to METEOR, which is also an exhibition hall.

Visit the Archive

[ 2019.05.01 ]

RUSSIAN SCIENTISTS PLAN 3D BIOPRINTING EXPERIMENTS ABOARD THE ISS

3D Bioprinting Solutions, a Russian bio-technical research laboratory, has announced plans to collaborate with scientists from the U.S. and Israel to deliver muscular tissue biomaterials to the International Space Station (ISS) in September as part of a microgravity 3D bioprinting experiment.

Anas Essop | 3D Printing Industry

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[ 2019.05.01 ]

The Race to Develop the Moon

For science, profit, and pride, China, the U.S., and private companies are hunting for resources on the lunar surface.

Rivka Galchen | The New Yorker

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[ 2019.05.01 ]

'Deep Learning' Algorithm Reveals Huge Saturn Storm in New Light

The software, called PlanetNet, mapped out a monster 2008 Saturn storm system in detail using data gathered by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which studied the ringed planet up close from 2004 through 2017.

Mike Wall | Space.com

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[ 2019.05.01 ]

'Mitigation of Shock' by Superflux

Set in London around 2050, 'Mitigation of Shock' is a pragmatic experiment practicing hope for a future disrupted by climate change.

Full documentation of the project + accompanying film.

Superflux

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[ 2019.04.30 ]

Inferi, the Hellfont

Inferi is a font family drew with a monk’s pen. Possessed by the evil beings whom dwell within, it is a tool made to speak the words which will end the world.

Two styles, Roman & Italic, 26 fonts available.

Blaze Type Foundry

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[ 2019.04.28 ]

ELLIS by STATION IDENT

Musician Zac Bentz outlines his process, sharing outtakes and the final sound for Warren Ellis' new animated television production ident.

Listen on Bandcamp

[ 2019.04.24 ]

A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

The Intercept launches “A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez,” a seven-minute film narrated by the congresswoman and illustrated by Molly Crabapple.

Naomi Klein | The Intercept

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[ 2019.04.23 ]

Cornell scientists create ‘living’ machines that eat, grow, and evolve

"We are introducing a brand-new, lifelike material concept powered by its very own artificial metabolism. We are not making something that’s alive, but we are creating materials that are much more lifelike than have ever been seen before."

Tristan Greene | TNW

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[ 2019.04.21 ]

Errolson Hugh Sees the Future

The designer behind Acronym—the cutting-edge fashion coveted by legions of fans like John Mayer and sci-fi wizards like William Gibson—is making clothes for the end of the world.

Chris Gayomali and Nikita Teryoshin | GQ

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[ 2019.04.21 ]

A Surprising Surge at Vavilov Ice Cap

“The fact that an apparently stable, cold-based glacier suddenly went from moving 20 meters per year to 20 meters per day was extremely unusual, perhaps unprecedented,” said Willis. “The numbers here are simply nuts. Before this happened, as far as I knew, cold-based glaciers simply didn’t do that...couldn’t do that.”

NASA Earth Observatory

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[ 2019.04.21 ]

What lies beneath: Robert Macfarlane travels 'Underland'

From prehistoric cave paintings to buried nuclear waste, underground spaces record how humans have lived. To explore Underland means voyaging into the deep past – and raises urgent questions about our planet’s future.

Robert Macfarlane | The Guardian

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[ 2019.04.17 ]

New Ways of Seeing

A four-part series authored by journalist and artist James Bridle examining how technology is changing visual culture.

BBC

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[ 2019.04.17 ]

Astrobee: ISS Robotic Free Flyer

The Astrobee project is preparing to launch a pair of free-flying cube robots that will operate inside the International Space Station (ISS) alongside astronauts. Astrobee’s primary objective is to provide a zero-g research facility for guest scientists. The Astrobees will replace the SPHERES robots that have been on the ISS since 2006.

Evan Ackerman | IEEE Spectrum

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[ 2019.04.15 ]

After More Than a Century, the Cyclocopter Is Making a Comeback

The Russian Advanced Research Foundation is developing a cyclocopter drone, which flies using an “egg-beater wing” propulsion system.

David Hambling | Popular Mechanics

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[ 2019.04.15 ]

After Scarcity by Bahar Noorizadeh

"After Scarcity is a sci-fi essay film that tracks Soviet cyberneticians (1950s – 1980s) in their attempt to build a fully-automated planned economy. If history at its best is a blueprint for science-fiction, revisiting contingent histories of economic technology might enable an access to the future." —Bahar Noorizdah, Artist

via DIS

Watch the Film

[ 2019.04.15 ]

Stratolaunch  Completes Historic First Flight of Aircraft

Stratolaunch Systems Corporation successfully completed the first flight of the world’s largest all-composite aircraft. The aircraft is a mobile launch platform that will enable airline-style access to space that is convenient, affordable and routine. The reinforced center wing can support multiple launch vehicles, weighing up to a total of 500,000 pounds.

Press Release | Stratolaunch

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[ 2019.04.14 ]

Pepsi Plans to Project a Giant Ad in the Night Sky Using Cubesats

A Russian company called StartRocket says it’s going to launch a cluster of cubesats into space that will act as an “orbital billboard,” projecting enormous advertisements into the night sky like artificial constellations.

Jon Christian | Futurism

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[ 2019.04.14 ]

Climate Chaos Is Coming — and the Pinkertons Are Ready

As they see it, global warming stands to make corporate security as high-stakes in the 21st century as it was in the 19th.

Noah Gallagher Shannon | The New York Times

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[ 2019.04.13 ]

NASA Invests in 18 Potentially Revolutionary Space Tech Concepts

Smart spacesuits and solar surfing may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but they are just two of the technology concepts NASA has selected for further research as part of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program. The program will fund 18 studies to determine the feasibility of early-stage technologies that could go on to change what’s possible in space.

Press Release | NASA

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[ 2019.04.12 ]

SpaceX has managed to land Falcon Heavy’s three rocket boosters for the first time

Two landed almost simultaneously back on Cape Canaveral (you can watch the video here). The third central booster, which had gone higher into orbit, landed on a ship platform in the Atlantic Ocean.

The Download | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.04.10 ]

Chinese scientists put human brain genes in monkeys—and maybe made them smarter

A study found eight modified monkeys did better on a memory test, and their brains also took longer to develop—as those of human children do.

Antonio Regalado | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.04.10 ]

Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

An international collaboration presents paradigm-shifting observations of the gargantuan black hole at the heart of distant galaxy Messier 87.

Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)

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[ 2019.04.09 ]

Screening Surveillance

Three short films speculating surveillance futures and the effects of deeply embedded and connected surveillant systems on our everyday lives, produced as part of a international multiphase project on Big Data Surveillance.

Surveillance Studies Centre

Watch the Films

[ 2019.04.08 ]

The Navy's plans for a fleet of unmanned 'ghost ships' are still shrouded in secrecy

As the Navy advances plans for a 10-ship "ghost fleet," leaders are assessing how much decision-making power to give large unmanned vessels that can operate without any humans aboard.

Gina Harkins | Military.com

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[ 2019.04.08 ]

DARPA Subterranean Challenge: Teams of Robots Compete to Explore Underground Worlds

The DARPA Subterranean Challenge will task teams of robots with autonomous exploration deep beneath the surface of the Earth.

Evan Ackerman | IEEE Spectrum

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[ 2019.04.08 ]

Gliding missiles that fly faster than Mach 5 are coming

The era of hypersonic, long distance weapons is almost upon us.

The Economist

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[ 2019.04.06 ]

This 3D-printed tower might be the future of architecture on Mars

Last week, NASA awarded the New York-based design studio SEArch+ and robotics company Apis Cor top prize in phase three of the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge for their conceptual tower.

Dianna Budds | Curbed

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[ 2019.04.05 ]

Could We Blow Up the Internet?

Is it possible to take down the internet by physically attacking its infrastructure?

Tim Maughan | Motherboard

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[ 2019.04.05 ]

Amazon plans to launch a massive constellation of more than 3,000 internet satellites

The plan, dubbed Project Kuiper, will send satellites up into orbit at three different altitudes. There will be 784 satellites at 367 miles (591 kilometers), 1,296 satellites at 379 miles, and 1,156 satellites at 391 miles, according to a filing with the ITU, which oversees global telecom satellite operations. Combined, these satellites will provide internet access to more than 95% of the global population, according to Amazon.

The Download | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.04.04 ]

Great Barrier Reef suffers 89% collapse in new coral after bleaching events

Scientists have measured how many adult corals survived along the length of the world’s largest reef system and how many new corals they produced in 2018 in the aftermath of severe heat stress and coral mortality. The results, published in Nature, show not only a dramatic reduction in new coral recruitment compared with historic levels, but also a change in the types of coral species produced.

Lisa Cox | The Guardian

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[ 2019.04.03 ]

South Korea first to roll out 5G services, beating U.S. and China

South Korea will become the first country to commercially launch fifth-generation (5G) services on Friday as it rolls out the latest wireless technology with Samsung Electronics’ new 5G-enabled smartphone Galaxy S10. The technology can offer 20-times faster data speeds than 4G long-term evolution (LTE) networks.

Ju-min Park | Reuters

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[ 2019.04.03 ]

NASA Says Debris From India’s Antisatellite Test Puts Space Station at Risk

NASA identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from the test, including about 60 trackable pieces at least 10 centimeters in size. Two dozen pieces were identified above the highest point of the International Space Station’s orbit.

Kai Schultz | The New York Times

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[ 2019.04.02 ]

Coming July 2019 - Space Settlements By Fred Scharmen

In the summer of 1975, NASA brought together a team of physicists, engineers, and space scientists—along with architects, urban planners, and artists—to design large-scale space habitats for millions of people.

Space Settlements examines these plans for life in space as serious architectural and spatial proposals.

Order the Book

[ 2019.04.02 ]

Canada warming at twice the global rate, leaked report finds

Canada is, on average, experiencing warming at twice the rate of the rest of the world, with Northern Canada heating up at almost three times the global average, according to a new government report.

CBC News

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[ 2019.04.01 ]

Do It Yourself! A New Film on the Life and Work of Donna Haraway

In ‘Donna Haraway: Story Telling for Earthly Survival’, the feminist theorist discusses ‘living well and giving heart’

Hestia Peppe | Frieze

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[ 2019.04.01 ]

'We Can't Trust the Permafrost Anymore': Doomsday Vault at Risk in Norway

Just over a decade after it first opened, the world's "doomsday vault" of seeds is imperiled by climate change as the polar region where it's located warms faster than any other area on the planet.

Eoin Higgins | Common Dreams

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[ 2019.04.01 ]

The Day the Dinosaurs Died

“We can trace our origins back to that event,” DePalma said. “To actually be there at this site, to see it, to be connected to that day, is a special thing. This is the last day of the Cretaceous. When you go one layer up—the very next day—that’s the Paleocene, that’s the age of mammals, that’s our age.”

Douglas Preston | The New Yorker

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[ 2019.03.30 ]

Handle Robot Reimagined for Logistics

Handle is a mobile manipulation robot designed for logistics. Handle autonomously performs mixed SKU pallet building and depalletizing after initialization and localizing against the pallets.

via Boston Dynamics YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2019.03.29 ]

GITAI Partners With JAXA to Send Telepresence Robots to Space

GITAI announced a joint research agreement with JAXA (the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency) to see what it takes for robots to be useful in orbit, with the goal of substantially reducing the amount of money spent sending food and air up to humans on the International Space Station.

Evan Ackerman | IEEE Spectrum

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[ 2019.03.29 ]

The Worst Disease Ever Recorded

Never before in recorded history has a single disease burned down so much of the tree of life. New estimates show that the doomsday fungus called Bd has caused the decline of over 500 species and the extinction of at least 90.

Ed Yong | The Atlantic

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[ 2019.03.25 ]

Don’t Call April Greiman the “Queen of New Wave”

“I felt like as soon as you’ve given it a name, it’s dead.” A longform interview with one of the most divisive figures in graphic design.

Meg Miller | AIGA Eye on Design

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[ 2019.03.22 ]

“Particle robot” works as a cluster of simple units

Loosely connected disc-shaped “particles” can push and pull one another, moving en masse to transport objects.

Rob Matheson | MIT News Office

Watch the Video

[ 2019.03.21 ]

No Barcode

The recently revived blog of designer Javier Garcia, described by him as follows:

"No Barcode is a blog about the modern past, it’s a collection of found illustration and design that I want to share so it doesn’t just exist in a drawer."

Visit the Blog

[ 2019.03.21 ]

Marvin Visions Typeface

Marvin Visions is a modern and consistent reinterpretation of Marvin, a typeface originally designed by Michael Chave in 1969 and published by Face Photosetting.

It has been revived and expanded by Mathieu Triay for the identity of Visions, a new science fiction magazine.

Learn More

[ 2019.03.21 ]

Apollo 11 Press Kits - The David Meerman Scott Collection

A digitized collection of the press kits that were prepared by public relations staff at the major contractors for NASA's Apollo 11 mission.

Visit apollopresskits.com

[ 2019.03.20 ]

The New Space Age: Experts Ponder the Future of Cosmic Exploration

This Pi Day (Thursday, March 14), scientists, astronauts, artists, engineers and designers gathered to discuss our future in space as we near the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing. The event, called "Beyond the Cradle 2019: Envisioning a New Space Age," hosted speakers ranging from former NASA astronaut Leland Melvin to Marc Okrand, a linguist who invented the Klingon language, and even glass artist John Simpson.

Chelsea Gohd | Space.com

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[ 2019.03.20 ]

A surprising number of people trust AI to make better policy decisions than politicians

A new survey on Europeans’ attitudes towards technology found that a quarter of people would prefer it if policy decisions were made by artificial intelligence instead of politicians.

Jackie Bischof | Quartz

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[ 2019.03.20 ]

Drone Maps Icy Lava Tube in Iceland in Preparation for Cave Exploration on the Moon and Mars

The SETI Institute and Astrobotic Technology, Inc. are announcing the successful mapping in 3D of the interior of an ice-rich lava tube in Iceland using a LiDAR-equipped drone.

“We went to Iceland to study a lava tube with massive amounts of ice inside it to understand better both the potential hazards and opportunities presented by the many lava caves we hope to explore on the Moon and Mars. One promising way to explore them is with drones.”

Press Release | SETI Institute

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[ 2019.03.19 ]

As air pollution gets worse, a dystopian accessory is born

The air is getting more dangerous to breathe all over the world — and a suite of companies are hoping to capitalize with a new fashion item.

Rose Eveleth | Vox

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[ 2019.03.19 ]

The US is working on one of the most expensive computers ever built

The "Aurora" supercomputer would be the first US computer to reach "exascale" performance, where a computer can do more than a quintillion calculations per second. Officials from the Department of Energy claim the $500 million machine will be roughly seven times faster than the current most powerful system.

via The Download | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.03.18 ]

How the Internet Travels Across Oceans

"People think that data is in the
 cloud, but it’s not. It’s in the ocean."

Adam Satariano | The New York Times

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[ 2019.03.18 ]

The world’s first genderless voice assistant is challenging gender stereotypes

Created by a group of linguists, technologists, and sound designers, Q hopes to “end gender bias” and encourage “more inclusivity in voice technology.”

Cara Curtis | TNW

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[ 2019.03.18 ]

Halo Drive: Lasers and Black Holes Could Launch Spaceships to Near Light Speed

"Using what he called a 'halo drive' — named for the ring of light it would create around a black hole — Kipping found that even spaceships with the mass of Jupiter could achieve relativistic speeds. 'A civilization could exploit black holes as galactic waypoints,' he wrote in a study accepted by the Journal of the British Interplanetary Society and detailed online Feb. 28 in the arXiv preprint server."

Charles Q. Choi | Space.com

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[ 2019.03.18 ]

The Weight of Light: A Collection of Solar Futures

A collection of science fiction stories, art, and essays exploring human futures powered by solar energy, with an upbeat, solarpunk twist.

From the Center for Science and the Imagination, at Arizona State University

Get the Free eBook

[ 2019.03.16 ]

How Dolphins on LSD Shaped the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

"For better or worse, this notion of dolphins as a prototypical extraterrestrial intelligence would shape the trajectory of interstellar communication for the next half century."

Daniel Oberhaus | Super Cluster

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[ 2019.03.14 ]

Russia says it's going to arm a submarine with 6 nuclear 'doomsday' devices

Russia built an underwater nuclear torpedo with a massive warhead designed to cause tsunamis and devastate entire continents. Russia said it will arm one of its most mysterious subs with up to six of these devices by 2020. The sub has also been linked to clandestine efforts to destroy vital undersea cables.

Alex Lockie | Business Insider

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[ 2019.03.13 ]

JAXA and Toyota Reach Agreement on Consideration Toward International Space Exploration

JAXA and Toyota have reached agreement to further cooperate on and accelerate their ongoing joint study of a manned, pressurized rover that employs fuel cell electric vehicle technologies, for human exploration activities on the lunar surface. The pressurized rover would accommodate two people, and have a total lunar-surface cruising range of more than 10,000 km.

via Toyota

View the Press Release

[ 2019.03.12 ]

A quantum experiment suggests there’s no such thing as objective reality

Physicists have long suspected that quantum mechanics allows two observers to experience different, conflicting realities. Now they’ve performed the first experiment that proves it.

via The Download | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.03.11 ]

The Willow Pattern 2.0

This latest cartoon by Tom Gauld, for New Scientist, is pretty great.

See the Cartoon

[ 2019.03.11 ]

Galaxy Simulations Offer a New Solution to the Fermi Paradox

Astronomers claim in a new paper that star motions should make it easy for civilizations to spread across the galaxy, but still we might find ourselves alone.

Rebecca Boye | Quanta

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[ 2019.03.09 ]

As we build rivals to human intelligence, James Bridle looks at our relationship with the planet’s other alien consciousnesses

"After wilfully ignoring the intelligences of others for so long, the centrality of human intelligence is on the point of being knocked violently aside by our own inventions. A new Copernican trauma looms, wherein we find ourselves standing upon a ruined planet, not smart enough to save ourselves, and no longer by any stretch of the imagination the smartest ones around."

James Bridle | Life Rewired

Read the Essay

[ 2019.03.09 ]

Fighting for climate action with 'The Uninhabitable Earth' author David Wallace-Wells: podcast and transcript

In his book “The Uninhabitable Earth”, David Wallace-Wells depicts a catastrophic future far worse than we ever imagined... and far sooner than we thought. It is undoubtedly a brutal truth to face, as you will hear in this episode, but if there’s any hope to avert the worst case scenarios, we have to start now.

Chris Hayes, with David Wallace-Wells | Why Is This Happening

Listen to Episode

[ 2019.03.09 ]

China opens its first Mars simulation base in Qinghai Province

Covering an area of 53,330 square meters, the base can accommodate 60 people in its capsules and hundreds in the base's tents. Construction started in June 2018 at a cost of about 150 million yuan ($22.3 million).

Liu Caiyu | Global Times

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[ 2019.03.03 ]

Space Station Celebrates 'A New Era' In Exploration With Arrival Of SpaceX Capsule

The new space vehicle, carrying only cargo and a human dummy, launched Saturday from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On Sunday, the ISS crew watched as Crew Dragon became the first American commercial space vehicle designed to carry humans to dock at the station, according to NASA.

Francesca Paris | NPR

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[ 2019.03.03 ]

The Snap Forward: New thinking for winning the climate fight

Help launch a bold new book about the end of predatory delay and the beginning of rapid climate action.

Kickstarter Campaign by Planetary Futurist Alex Steffen

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[ 2019.03.01 ]

Trigger Warning

‘Trigger Warning’ is a fast paced journey through a city of memes.

An urban hinterland of embodied ideas and warring ideologies. Switching between various first-person perspectives, the film embodies the current culture clashes bubbling away beneath the surface of the city.

via Superflux Vimeo

Watch the Short Film

[ 2019.03.01 ]

NASA is testing a new submarine that will hunt for undiscovered sea life — and scientists eventually want it to look for aliens on Europa

Their goal is to create a drone submersible so small and so light that they'll one day be able to shoot it into space to explore other oceans. Orpheus is the first step in that direction.

Hilary Brueck | Business Insider

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[ 2019.03.01 ]

Steam-powered spacecraft could jump-start asteroid exploration

A team led by the University of Central Florida (UCF) has unveiled a spacecraft that will use water to explore asteroids. Instead of ending the mission when it runs out of propellant, the craft will pull water from the celestial body it’s visiting. The technology could give a new lease of life to asteroid mining.

Erin Winick | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.03.01 ]

Backflipping MIT Mini Cheetah

MIT'S new mini cheetah robot is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip. At only 20 pounds the limber quadruped can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed.

via MIT YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2019.03.01 ]

Mice get night vision with a nanoparticle injection

The tests, published in Cell, found the infrared effect lasted in the mice for 10 weeks, causing no long-term damage (though some had cloudy corneas for up to two weeks.)

via The Download | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.03.01 ]

NASA is going back to the future with nuclear rockets

Tucked into the recent spending bill that was passed by Congress is a line item for $100 million for NASA to develop nuclear thermal rocket engines, according to a recent article in Space News.

Mark R. Whittington | The Hill

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[ 2019.02.27 ]

A Troubling Discovery in the Deepest Ocean Trenches

In the Mariana Trench, the lowest point in any ocean, every tiny animal tested had plastic pollution hiding in its gut.

Ed Yong | The Atlantic

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[ 2019.02.25 ]

A World Without Clouds

A state-of-the-art supercomputer simulation indicates that a feedback loop between global warming and cloud loss can push Earth’s climate past a disastrous tipping point in as little as a century.

Natalie Wolchover | Quanta Magazine

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[ 2019.02.23 ]

Earth's atmosphere stretches out to the moon — and beyond

A recent discovery based on observations by the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO, shows that the gaseous layer that wraps around Earth reaches up to 630 000 km away, or 50 times the diameter of our planet.

“The Moon flies through Earth’s atmosphere,” says Igor Baliukin of Russia’s Space Research Institute, lead author of the paper presenting the results.

ESA | Space Science

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[ 2019.02.23 ]

China’s CRISPR twins might have had their brains inadvertently enhanced

New research suggests that a controversial gene-editing experiment to make children resistant to HIV may also have enhanced their ability to learn and form memories.

Antonio Regalado | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.02.23 ]

How Google, Microsoft, and Big Tech Are Automating the Climate Crisis

Amazon, Google, and Microsoft have all struck lucrative arrangements—collectively worth billions of dollars—to provide automation, cloud, and AI services to some of the world’s biggest oil companies, and they are actively pursuing more.

Brian Merchant | Gizmodo

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[ 2019.02.20 ]

The future of Mars exploration may rest on a glider

After Opportunity, now what? An unpowered inflatable craft using thermal updrafts to stay aloft could cost-effectively map less-documented parts of the planet’s surface to help plan lander missions.

via MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.02.20 ]

T2 Teaser

"Still the best Teaser for a film ever. No contest."

via @Timobros

Watch the Teaser

[ 2019.02.20 ]

Life probably exists beyond Earth. So how do we find it?

With next-generation telescopes, tiny space probes, and more, scientists aim to search for life beyond our solar system—and make contact.

Writing by Jamie Shreeve, Photographs by Spencer Lowell, Art by Dana Berry | National Geographic

Read the Story

[ 2019.02.18 ]

The Communal Mind — Patricia Lockwood travels through the internet

"A few years ago, when it suddenly occurred to us that the internet was a place we could never leave, I began to keep a diary of what it felt like to be there in the days of its snowy white disintegration, which felt also like the disintegration of my own mind." —Patricia Lockwood

via London Review of Books

Read the Essay

[ 2019.02.18 ]

The Architecture Draftsman

Imaginary architectures drawn by Stefan Davidovici, Architect, Milan.

Visit the Blog

[ 2019.02.18 ]

Plummeting insect numbers 'threaten collapse of nature'

More than 40% of insect species are declining and a third are endangered, the analysis found. The rate of extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles.

Damian Carrington | The Guardian

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[ 2019.02.18 ]

Study blames YouTube for rise in number of Flat Earthers

Researchers believe they have identified the prime driver for a startling rise in the number of people who think the Earth is flat: Google’s video-sharing site, YouTube.

Ian Sample | The Guardian

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[ 2019.02.18 ]

University of South Florida's Brain-drone Race Welcomes Diversity and Inclusivity

The University of South Florida held its inaugural Brain-Drone Race, in which participants competed using drones controlled by their mental electrical signals.

via Center for the Study of the Drone

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[ 2019.02.17 ]

Meet the Mormon Transhumanists Seeking Salvation in the Singularity

They believe the coming leaps in science and technology will help us realize the Mormon promise of achieving perfect, immortal bodies and becoming Gods.

Erin Clare Brown | Medium

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[ 2019.02.14 ]

Underfutures

A podcast from Changeist created to dive into trends, dynamics and emerging scenarios that we think are interesting, underplayed, and under-examined in contemporary discussions about futures.

Listen to the Podcast

[ 2019.02.14 ]

Warren Ellis Ltd

"I’ve been testing out various publishing systems and formats for the last few months, to settle on what I want to do and how I want to act for, say, the next three to five years. I think this is it. So I’m signing and dating the first page of the notebook."

Warren Ellis | warrenellis.ltd

Visit the Site

[ 2019.02.12 ]

Intro to Font Metrics

Font files contain a wealth of information about a typeface. Whether you’re a designer or a developer, learning more about how fonts work can open new doors in how you work and what you create.

Weston Thayer | westonthayer.com

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[ 2019.02.12 ]

Russia to disconnect from the internet as part of a planned test

Russian authorities and major internet providers are planning to disconnect the country from the internet as part of a planned experiment, Russian news agency RosBiznesKonsalting (RBK) reported last week.

Catalin Cimpanu | ZDNet

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[ 2019.02.09 ]

Army 'mad scientists' want your best science fiction

The Army’s Training and Doctrine Command, headquartered at Fort Eustis, envision future wars in a variety of ways. Now they’re asking for your help, and all you have to do is impress a few of their mad scientists.

Hugh Lessig | Daily Press

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[ 2019.02.04 ]

It’s time to start taking the search for E.T. seriously, astronomers say

Some scientists are pushing for NASA to make looking for alien technology an official goal.

Lisa Grossman | Science News

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[ 2019.02.01 ]

Don’t mean to alarm you, but there’s a big hole in the world’s most important glacier

The melting of this glacier could lead to as much as 10 feet of sea level rise over the next century or so. If we’re unlucky, much of that could happen the lifetimes of people alive today, flooding every coastal city on Earth and potentially grinding civilization to a halt.

Eric Holthaus | Grist

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[ 2019.01.31 ]

Computers and Automation

A directory of PDFs of Computers and Automation, the first computer magazine. This publication initiated the first Computer Art Contest in 1963 which features early pioneers in computer and plotter art.

via Duane King

View the Directory

[ 2019.01.31 ]

America colonisation ‘cooled Earth's climate’

Colonisation of the Americas at the end of the 15th Century killed so many people, it disturbed Earth's climate.

Jonathan Amos | BBC News

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[ 2019.01.31 ]

New Newsletter - The Airlock

Your gateway to the future of space technology, delivered each Wednesday.

via MIT Technology Review

Sign Up

[ 2019.01.23 ]

The European Space Agency plans to start mining for natural resources on the moon

The European Space Agency plans to start mining for water and oxygen on the moon by 2025. The agency announced Monday it has signed a 1-year contract with European aerospace company ArianeGroup to explore mining regolith, also known as lunar soil or moon dust.

Lauren Kent | CNN

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[ 2019.01.22 ]

Why your new heart could be made in space one day

Efforts to grow human hearts in the lab are showing promise, but are hampered by the need for the organs to grow around a "scaffolding" to make sure they don't collapse during the process. Space tech company Techshot believes zero gravity could be the answer.

Emma Woollacott | BBC News

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[ 2019.01.18 ]

GERRY, a documentary film about the life and influence of Gerard K. O’Neill

Through old stories of “Gerry” as many called him, and the social impact he made on the world, this documentary pays tribute to the unsung hero of today’s space race, while hoping to inspire all ages and walks of life to reignite our planet’s space venturing spirit.

Learn More

[ 2019.01.18 ]

The Government’s Secret UFO Program Funded Research on Wormholes and Extra Dimensions

Documents released by the Department of Defense reveal some of what its infamous Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program was working on.

Sarah Emerson | Motherboard

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[ 2019.01.17 ]

E|A|S (Evolving Asteroid Starships)

Video depicting an experimental modular spacecraft for long-distance space travel. Created under the supervision of Dr. Angelo Vermeulen, a former NASA collaborator and current researcher at TU Delft.

by Joris Putteneers

Watch the Video

[ 2019.01.17 ]

Relaxation Tape for Solo Space Travel

2nd run of pro-dubbed cassettes — a group of 50 were discovered in a secret compartment of a fuselage in a museum just outside of Vladivostok. Aging or preservation has turned the artwork a lovely shade of green. Magnetic tape has remained intact on all copies.

by The National Pool (U.S.S.R. ambient composers alliance create these sounds)

Listen on Bandcamp

[ 2019.01.16 ]

Are We Living Through Climate Change’s Worst-Case Scenario?

“We’re actually a lot closer than we should be; I can say that with confidence,” says Rob Jackson, an Earth scientist at Stanford and the chair of the Global Carbon Project, which leads the research tracking worldwide emissions levels.

Robinson Meyer | The Atlantic

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[ 2019.01.16 ]

The World’s First Artificial Meteor Shower

A Japanese company is about to launch a satellite that's the first step toward creating the world's first artificial meteor shower. The satellite is hitching a ride on the Japanese space agency’s Epsilon Rocket, due to launch at 9.50am Japan time on Thursday.

via The Download | MIT Technology Review

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[ 2019.01.15 ]

PT Root UI

Designed by Vitaly Kuzmin and released by Paratype in 2018, PT Root UI is a modern uniwidth sans serif whose individual character widths are constant across all weights. It consists of four styles of normal proportions, from Light to Bold, intended for screen reading, interfaces, websites, as well as wayfinding systems.

Free Download

[ 2019.01.15 ]

STATION IDENT: VOLUME 01

Long ago, a broadcast network was established across the galaxy. Each of the 78 stations played a unique identification signal across the network once a day as a sort of “hello.” As the universe inevitably expanded, these stations fell into disrepair. Many maintained their integrity for quite a while, while others quickly became corrupted and haunted. A small number, left to their own devices, came alive only to find something missing, never knowing what had been lost…

by Zac Bentz (ASCAP), Xero Music

Listen on Bandcamp

[ 2019.01.10 ]

From the minds of Jordan Peele and Charlie Sanders: Weird City

A satirical anthology set in the not-too-distant future metropolis of Weird. In this dystopian setting, the middle class has completely vanished dividing Weird City into two sections: Above the Line (The Haves), and Below the Line (The Have Nots). Presiding over the denizens of the city is the strange and mysterious Dr. Negari, who weaves all of the stories together.

Watch the Trailer

[ 2019.01.10 ]

Robots of the future: more R2D2 than C3PO

In a paper just published in Nature Machine Intelligence, CSIRO's Active Integrated Matter Future Science Platform (AIM FSP) says robots could soon be taking their engineering cues from evolution, creating truly startling and effective designs.

via Tech Xplore

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[ 2019.01.09 ]

Earth Mother, Sky Father: 2030

Visual artist Kordae Henry's seismic ritual performance draws on the likes of Sun Ra and Khalil Joseph to imagine an Afrofuturist utopia.

via Nowness

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[ 2019.01.08 ]

Stuff in Space

Stuff in Space is a realtime 3D map of objects in Earth orbit, visualized using WebGL. The website updates daily with orbit data from Space-Track.org and uses the excellent satellite.js Javascript library to calculate satellite positions.

View the Map

[ 2019.01.08 ]

Centre for Visibility Design

Using scientific methods to improve the legibility of typefaces and pictograms.

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design

Learn More

[ 2019.01.02 ]

NASA's technosignatures report: every way to find evidence of an intelligent civilization

"If we can find technosignatures — evidence of some technology that modifies its environment in ways that are detectable – then we will be permitted to infer the existence, at least at some time, of intelligent technologists."

via Phys.org

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[ 2018.12.31 ]

Dreaming the Back Loop

The washing away of claims to human mastery over the world, the terminal diagnoses of western civilization, and the human and nonhuman transgression of earthly tipping points signal our entrance into the Anthropocene’s back loop.

Stephanie Wakefield | Affidavit

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[ 2018.12.27 ]

FACING NUCLEAR REALITY: 35 years after The Day After

A look back at The Day After and the role played by ordinary citizens in a small Midwestern city shows how the risk of nuclear war took center stage in 1983, and what it would take for that to happen again in 2018.

Dawn Stover | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

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[ 2018.12.23 ]

Be Good for Goodness’ Sake

In a not-too-distant Christmas, Amazon's child-friendly surveillance elves will motivate your kid to be nice not naughty with the promise of nonstop streaming content and elfcoins.

Tim Maughan | Terraform

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[ 2018.12.18 ]

There Is No Planet B

There is no Planet B. We have to keep this planet healthy, because it's our one and only home, our extended body. Margaret Thatcher infamously said that "there is no alternative" to corporate capitalism. But there is absolutely no alternative to maintaining life on Earth.

Kim Stanley Robinson | Sierra

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[ 2018.12.18 ]

A State of Sin

Throughout history, random numbers have been used in gambling, divination, and democracy. They are also essential to modern computation, used in everything from cryptography to scientific research. However, true random numbers cannot be calculated by machines alone. Rather, they must be sampled from the world itself.

Robotic installation art by James Bridle.

Learn More

[ 2018.12.17 ]

The Grim Future of Urban Warfare

New technologies are making war even more horrific.

Darran Anderson | The Atlantic

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[ 2018.12.16 ]

We have the technology to build a colony on the moon. Let’s do it.

Let’s put aside these murky plans to orbit the moon in a can for no good reason. Let’s build a base on the moon where not only Americans can take small steps in the peaceful pursuit of knowledge, but also where the world can take giant leaps toward opening of a new frontier.

Robert Zubrin and Homer Hickam | The Washington Post

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[ 2018.12.12 ]

The Fossils of the 21st Century

Collectively, the relics of the Anthropocene, also known as “technofossils”, will telegraph a story to the distant future.

Maddie Stone | Earther

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[ 2018.12.11 ]

Generative Art Project

Exhibiting and promoting the best of the Generative Art movement from across the globe.

Curated by James Pricer and Julia Morton

Austin, TX

Learn More

[ 2018.12.11 ]

PwC recommended that corporations should ask science fiction writers about the future

In 2017, PwC published "Using science fiction to explore business innovation," a guide for corporations that wanted to work with sf writers to think about the future of their businesses.

Cory Doctorow | Boing Boing

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

Charles Aweida: Man And His Robot

Oakland based artist Charles Aweida is manipulating the physical through his robotic language to create fine art.

Kathryn Zerbe | Bob Cut

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath

New research shows that the Permian mass extinction in the oceans was caused by global warming that left animals unable to breathe. As temperatures rose and the metabolism of marine animals sped up, the warmer waters could not hold enough oxygen for them to survive.

University of Washington | via Phys.org

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

Amazon workers hospitalized after warehouse robot releases bear repellent

An Amazon robot tore open a can of bear repellant at the company's New Jersey warehouse on Wednesday, hospitalizing 24 workers.

Saqib Shah | Engadget

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

We Asked 105 Experts What Gives Them Hope About the Future

Welcome to the bright side of Motherboard’s two-part poll about the future.

Becky Ferreira | Motherboard

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

We Asked 105 Experts What Scares and Inspires Them Most About the Future

Climate change, extremism, and artificial intelligence were among the top fears, and young people, technology, and equality were among the top hopes.

Becky Ferreira | Motherboard

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Accelerate Like a ‘Speeding Freight Train’ in 2018

Greenhouse gas emissions worldwide are growing at an accelerating pace this year, researchers said Wednesday, putting the world on track to face some of the most severe consequences of global warming sooner than expected.

Kendra Pierre-Louis | The New York Times

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[ 2018.12.06 ]

A Dress Rehearsal for a Crewed Mission to Mars

A photo series from the Mars analog in southern Oman staged by the Austrian Space Forum (OeWF). For the three-week mission this past February, a team of six analog astronauts and nine support crew traveled to the desert of the country's Dhofar region.

Photography by Florian Voggeneder

Kelsey Lannin | Wired

View the Photo Gallery

[ 2018.12.05 ]

The Official HELLBOY - MIGNOLAVERSE Timeline Revealed

Dark Horse has made an official Mignolaverse timeline to be released next year for the inaugural Hellboy Day.

Chris Arrant | Newsarama

Learn More

[ 2018.12.05 ]

An Oral History of the Warren Ellis Forum

The Warren Ellis Forum wasn't just an online tool for comic creators to banter and barb; it was a breeding ground for the voices that would define the medium in the years to come. In this oral history from Joshua Rivera, a host of the forum's most activist participants discuss how one man and his website catalyzed a new era of sequential art.

Joshua Rivera | Image Comics

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[ 2018.12.05 ]

Toyota's humanoid robot is successfully on 5G

Toyota says 5G will pave the way for robots in real-world scenarios, like environmental disasters and health care.

via Mashable

Watch the Video

[ 2018.12.05 ]

Project Elowan: A plant-robot hybrid

Elowan is a cybernetic lifeform, a plant in direct dialogue with a machine. Using its own internal electrical signals, the plant is interfaced with a robotic extension that drives it toward light.

MIT Media Lab

Learn More

[ 2018.12.04 ]

What Our Science Fiction Says About Us

Different visions of the future are springing up around the globe. Tom Cassauwers explores what these movements reveal about the places in which they appear – including China, Russia and Africa – and how imagining alternative realities can be subversive.

Tom Cassauwers | BBC Culture

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[ 2018.12.04 ]

Even though ‘we are in the darkest timeline,’ N.K. Jemisin still thinks humanity is worth saving

"At the end of the day I’m really just trying to tell a story that is entertaining. It’s just that what is entertaining these days is some dark [stuff]. I was not expecting [“The Stone Sky”] to do as well as it did, partly because we are in the darkest timeline."

An interview with N.K. Jemisin.

Everdeen Mason | The Washington Post

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[ 2018.12.04 ]

The Large Hadron Collider is shutting down for 2 years

The world’s most powerful particle accelerator has gone quiet. Particles took their last spin around the Large Hadron Collider on December 3 before scientists shut the machine down for two years of upgrades.

Emily Conover | Science News

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[ 2018.12.04 ]

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrives at asteroid Bennu

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft completed its 1.2 billion-mile journey to arrive at the asteroid Bennu Monday. The spacecraft executed a maneuver that transitioned it from flying toward Bennu to operating around the asteroid.

NASA | via Science Daily

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[ 2018.12.03 ]

A startup is about to test a ‘gas station in space’ that could one day refuel satellites

Fuel is heavy. And when you launch a satellite into space, the amount of fuel you give it determines how long it can stay operational. That is, unless you can refuel at a space gas station.

via The Download | MIT Technology Review

Read More

[ 2018.11.30 ]

NASA takes a tangible step back toward the Moon with commercial program

NASA announced Thursday that it has partnered with nine companies to enable the delivery of small scientific payloads to the lunar surface.

Eric Berger | Ars Technica

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[ 2018.11.29 ]

'A Robot Killed a Man': A New Doc Looks at the Terrifying Future of Automation

HBO's 'The Truth About Killer Robots' examines the legal, economic, psychological, and moral implications of our inevitable, AI-run dystopia.

An interview with filmmaker Maxim Pozdorovkin.

Seth Ferranti | Vice

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[ 2018.11.29 ]

US Army soldiers will soon wear Microsoft’s HoloLens AR goggles in combat

Microsoft has won a $480 million deal to supply more than 100,000 augmented-reality HoloLens headsets to the US Army, Bloomberg reports.

via The Download | MIT Technology Review

Read More

[ 2018.11.27 ]

Climate change: CO2 emissions rising for first time in four years

Global efforts to tackle climate change are way off track says the UN, as it details the first rise in CO2 emissions in four years.

Matt McGrath | BBC News

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[ 2018.11.27 ]

Burning Fossil Fuels Almost Ended All Life on Earth

A road trip through the geological ruins of our planet's worst mass extinction.

"…we have an analog in Earth’s history. And it’s fucking scary."

Peter Brannan | The Atlantic

Read More

[ 2018.11.27 ]

The Time Capsules That Will Outlast the Apocalypse

There are myriad of ways that the world as we know it could come crashing down, from nuclear war to rampant climate change. But somehow, if we’re to be remembered, our information must outlast these cataclysms.

Robin George Andrews | Earther

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[ 2018.11.26 ]

InSight Is Catching Rays on Mars

NASA's InSight has sent signals to Earth indicating that its solar panels are open and collecting sunlight on the Martian surface.

JPL | InSight Mission News

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[ 2018.11.26 ]

FOURTH NATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT

Volume II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States

The National Climate Assessment (NCA) assesses the science of climate change and variability and its impacts across the United States, now and throughout this century.

Read the Report

[ 2018.11.26 ]

Russia Has Started to Train Its Entire Military to Fight Drones

After Syrian insurgent groups attacked Russian forces in Syria, the Defense Ministry began laying plans for wide-scale response.

Patrick Tucker | Defense One

Read More

[ 2018.11.25 ]

EXCLUSIVE: Chinese scientists are creating CRISPR babies

A daring effort is under way to create the first children whose DNA has been tailored using gene editing.

Antonio Regalado | MIT Technology Review

Read More

[ 2018.11.25 ]

Beijing plans an AI Atlantis for the South China Sea – without a human in sight

China is planning to build a deep sea base for unmanned submarine science and defence operations in the South China Sea, a centre that might become the first artificial intelligence colony on Earth.

Stephen Chen | South China Morning Post

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[ 2018.11.25 ]

Yesenia Thibault-Picazo crafts objects from precious materials of the future

London-based designer Yesenia Thibault-Picazo has created three household objects for the anthropocene era, using materials she believes will be used by craftsmen hundreds of years in the future.

Gunseli Yalcinkaya | De Zeen

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[ 2018.11.22 ]

An electric plane with no moving parts has made its first flight

The turbineless design uses electroaerodynamic propulsion to fly and could herald the arrival of quieter, lower-emission aircraft.

Erin Winick | MIT Technology Review

Read More

[ 2018.11.20 ]

Documenting Hate: New American Nazis

In the wake of the deadly anti-Semitic attack at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, FRONTLINE and ProPublica present a new investigation into white supremacist groups in America – in particular, a neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division, that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military.

Watch the Report

[ 2018.11.20 ]

With disease in shelters and hotels at capacity, wildfire evacuees desperately seek refuge

The most devastating fire in California history began in the Sierra foothills in the morning hours of Nov. 8, prompting a hectic evacuation that has left at least 52,000 people in hotels, relatives’ homes, parking lots and makeshift shelters…

Frances Stead Sellers, Scott Wilson and Tim Craig | The Washington Post

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[ 2018.11.20 ]

THE END OF TRUST (MCSWEENEY’S ISSUE 54)

In our first-ever entirely nonfiction issue of McSweeney’s, The End of Trust (McSweeney’s Issue 54) features more than thirty writers and artists investigating surveillance in the digital age.

Available from The McSweeney’s Store

Learn More

[ 2018.11.20 ]

Lab-grown ‘mini brains’ produce electrical patterns that resemble those of premature babies

‘Mini brains’ grown in a dish have spontaneously produced human-like brain waves for the first time — and the electrical patterns look similar to those seen in premature babies. The advancement could help scientists to study early brain development.

Sara Reardon | Nature

Read More

[ 2018.11.20 ]

We Are NASA

We’ve taken giant leaps and left our mark in the heavens. Now we’re building the next chapter, returning to the Moon to stay, and preparing to go beyond. We are NASA – and after 60 years, we’re just getting started.

NASA | via YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2018.11.20 ]

RoboDoc: The Creation of RoboCop

RoboDoc is a brand new feature length documentary from the makers of @uk_leviathan and @frightnightdoc Directed by @Griff_est88

via Twitter @RoboCop_Doc

Watch the Trailer

[ 2018.11.19 ]

NASA picks ancient Martian river delta for 2020 rover touchdown

"The delta is a good place for evidence of life to be deposited and then preserved for the billions of years that have elapsed since this lake was present." —Ken Farley, Mars 2020 project scientist at NASA's JPL

Kerry Sheridan | Phys.org

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

Extinction Rebellion protests block London bridges

Organisers said thousands gathered in central London to demand the government take greater action on climate change.

BBC News

Read More

[ 2018.11.18 ]

The Dystopia is Already Here

"Since people have been asking I thought I'd recap my #dystopia talk at @theuxcrunch from Thursday. The examples used are not what if scenarios. These all happened. #triggerwarning's apply. If you can make it thru to the end I have suggestions for how we can claw back some hope."

Daniel Harvey | via Twitter

View the Thread

[ 2018.11.18 ]

The bodyguard at the end of the world

Steve Braunias resumes his occasional series about preparing for Doomsday with a report on a strange trip to Sydney to interview a New Zealander who claims to be selling million-dollar bunkers and shelters.

Steve Braunias | NZ Herald

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

John W. Campbell, a chief architect of science fiction's Golden Age, was as brilliant as he was problematic

…he went from being one of America’s most prescient futurists to one of its ugliest reactionaries.

Scott Bradfield | Los AngelesTimes

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

We are heading for a New Cretaceous, not for a new normal

…our problem is not confined to post-industrial-era CO2 emissions (global warming, in any case, probably began with forest clearance for early agriculture), but insists that the Holocene was a freakish gift to humanity that we have exploited and taken for granted. We are now assisting at its funeral.

Peter Forbes | Aeon

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

How Extreme Weather Is Shrinking the Planet

With wildfires, heat waves, and rising sea levels, large tracts of the earth are at risk of becoming uninhabitable. But the fossil-fuel industry continues its assault on the facts.

Bill McKibben | The New Yorker

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Air Quality in California: Devastating Fire Leads to a New Danger

The wildfires that have laid waste to vast parts of California are presenting residents with a new danger: air so thick with smoke it ranks among the dirtiest in the world.

Julie Turkewitz and Matt Richtel | The New York Times

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Policies of China, Russia and Canada threaten 5C climate change, study finds

Ranking of countries’ goals shows even EU on course for more than double safe level of warming.

Jonathan Watts | The Guardian

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Robot-soldiers, stealth jets and drone armies: the future of war

The US is racing to devise the next generation of weapons. Will China beat them to it?

Katrina Manson | Financial Times

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Looking Back on NASA’s Vivid 1970s Visions of Space Living

Feast your peepers on these artistic interpretations of a colonized cosmos.

Evan Nicole Brown | Atlas Obscura

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

How 'miniature suns' could provide cheap, clean energy

We're just five years away from harnessing almost unlimited power from "miniature suns", some start-ups say: nuclear fusion reactors that could provide abundant, cheap and clean energy.

Emma Woollacott | BBC News

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

How Gravity Built the World's Fastest Jet Suit

Richard Browning built the world's fastest personal jet suit. WIRED spoke with him to find out about the design process and engineering of a radical new form of transportation.

Via Wired | The Scene

Watch the Video

[ 2018.11.14 ]

Robert Zemeckis Returns To Science Fiction With ‘Project Blue Book’ & ‘Bios’

On Monday, Zemeckis talked about the two projects: Bios, the upcoming feature film; and Project Blue Book, a television series that premieres in January on History.

Geoff Boucher | Deadline Hollywood

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

AI software helped NASA dream up this spider-like interplanetary lander

Using an AI design process, engineers at software company Autodesk and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory came up with a new interplanetary lander concept that could explore distant moons like Europa and Enceladus.

Loren Grush | The Verge

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

LOW←TECH MAGAZINE

This website is a solar-powered, self-hosted version of Low-tech Magazine. It has been designed to radically reduce the energy use associated with accessing our content.

Visit the Site

[ 2018.11.14 ]

Low-tech Magazine’s Solar-Powered Website is Rewriting the Rules of Web Design

The page is at the whims of the weather—a sunny day allows the website to run at full capacity; rainy days can drain the battery to the point where the page won’t load at all.

Liz Stinson | AIGA Eye on Design

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

Isro’s GSLV-MkIII-D2 rocket places GSAT-29 in orbit

The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) on Wednesday successfully placed another communication satellite in orbit, while also achieving a crucial success of GSLV-MkIII rocket which is slated to launch two big missions—Chandrayaan-2 and the human space mission—in the next four years.

Chethan Kumar, U Tejonmayam | The Times of India

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

Data From a Dead Satellite Reveals Lost Continents Under Antarctica

“These gravity images are revolutionizing our ability to study the least understood continent on Earth—Antarctica.”

Becky Ferreira | Motherboard

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

Researchers Just Turned On the World's Most Powerful Computer Designed to Mimic a Human Brain

Neuromorphic computing just got a big boost with a million-core supercomputer that took over a decade to build.

Daniel Oberhaus | Motherboard

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

Decades after ‘Star Wars,’ Pentagon looks back to the future on missile defense

The Pentagon’s missile defense policy, if it is released, and February budget request could indicate whether the administration intends to advance an effort to put interceptors in space beyond the study stage.

Paul Sonne | The Washington Post

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.13 ]

This Is What USAF Bomber Pilots Would Wear During a Nuclear Apocalypse

It's an obscure Cold War-era technological relic that's still in use—and becoming increasingly relevant.

Tyler Rogoway | The Drive

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.13 ]

Where Will Science Take Us? To the Stars

A monthlong visit to observatories in Chile, Hawaii and Los Angeles revealed spellbinding visions of the heavens.

The second of a two-part series on science tourism.

Peter Kujawinski | The New York Times

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.13 ]

Clandestine: A Limited and Cryptographic Edition

New from Field Notes: The 41st design in our series of Quarterly Editions has a sleek, mysterious look, fitting for an edition all about secret codes and ciphers.

Learn More

[ 2018.11.13 ]

Will humanity survive this century? Sir Martin Rees predicts 'a bumpy ride' ahead

"There is the idea that we should despair and evacuate this planet and go somewhere else. That's a dangerous delusion."

An interview with esteemed British astronomer Sir Martin Rees.

Dennis Chow | Mach

Read the Interview

[ 2018.11.13 ]

Burned-Out Cars, Smoke in the Air, Aerial Assaults, All in California

…at every point in the panorama of disaster underway there is a semblance of war — the scenes, the scents, the sounds, the emotions, and even the language of firefighting, of “aerial assaults” and “boots on the ground.”

Tim Arango | The New York Times

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.13 ]

Sons of the Pre-Apocalypse

My son was born last week, right before two historic wildfires hit California—his new home state—and burned whole cities to the ground.

Brain Merchant | Motherboard

Read the Essay

[ 2018.11.12 ]

Existential nexus: The intersection of technological threats

In this issue, leading experts explore how quickly changing technologies that could pose existential threats to humanity increasingly intersect with one another and, as they do, pose new types of global dangers.

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists | November 2018 Special Issue

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[ 2018.11.12 ]

Our New Age, 1957-1973

Over 15 years, Spilhaus worked with three different artists to make scientific knowledge fun and accessible. Each Sunday comic strip illustrated a recent advance in science or engineering, discussing its implications for how people might live, work or play in the future.

Roger Turner | Picturing Meteorology: Images of Science and History

Read the Post

[ 2018.11.12 ]

Minnesota Experimental City: the 1960s town based on a comic strip

It had cars on rails, 100% recycling and a nuclear power station in the centre, all covered by a massive dome. So what went wrong with Athelstan Spilhaus’s vision of the future?

Steve Rose | The Guardian

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.11 ]

Rocket Lab Successfully Launches Its First Commercial Payload Into Orbit

The company’s Electron rocket launched at 4:50 pm local time from the company’s New Zealand launch site on Nov 11, carrying six satellites.

Andy Pasztor | The Wall Street Journal

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.11 ]

How a Meteor Crash Formed Stunning Desert Glass

Unbeknown to the colliding mountains and swinging apes of the Miocene, the 420,000 square miles that make up the Libyan desert would soon be caramelized into shards of foggy green glass. This rare and precious material, known as Libyan Desert Glass, was found in King Tutankhamun’s burial tomb millions of years later.

Evan Nicole Brown | Atlas Obscura

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.09 ]

Entire cities evacuate as hellish wildfires whip through California

A trio of rapidly expanding wildfires are burning in California, marking the latest in a string of harrowing climate-related disasters in America.

Eric Holthaus | Grist

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.09 ]

The Voice of Carl Sagan

We dusted off some of our favorite vintage promo clips Dr. Sagan recorded for The Planetary Society to inspire a generation of members to join us in advancing space science and exploration.

The Planetary Society | via Twitter

View the Thread

[ 2018.11.09 ]

We need to change the way we talk about space exploration

Building a sustainable human presence on other worlds should be open to all. Comparing the journey to violent conquest doesn't help.

An interview with astronomer Lucianne Walkowicz.

Nadia Drake | National Geographic

Read the Interview

[ 2018.11.09 ]

ONE WEIRD TRICK

"ONE WEIRD TRICK is out today! This album is us trying to make sense of the end of the world. Not a polemic, but a process. What it feels like to be haunted by an increasingly uncertain tomorrow, chasing future echoes down the hall. These are the songs you dance to as the clock ticks closer to midnight." —Ghost Cop

Hear the Album on Bandcamp

[ 2018.11.08 ]

Aphex Twin's Mask Collapses

After years of feeding the mystery machine, Richard D. James is offering us more pieces of himself.

Andrew Nosnitsky | Crack Magazine

Read the Interview

[ 2018.11.08 ]

China's state-run Xinhua News Agency debuts 'AI anchor' to read the news

The state-run press agency in China, Xinhua, will now deliver news using "AI anchors" made of digital composites that use synthesized voices to "read" the news.

Via Mashable

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.07 ]

AIGA Design Futures

This research project examines seven trends shaping the context for the practice of design.

Via AIGA

Learn More

[ 2018.11.06 ]

Why we shouldn’t cry ‘aliens’ about that interstellar space rock just yet

What to expect when you’re expecting aliens.

Loren Grush | The Verge

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.05 ]

E.T., we’re home

Existing laser technology could be fashioned into Earth’s “porch light” to attract alien astronomers, study finds.

Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.04 ]

The Sub of the Future Is a Drone Mothership Inspired by a Sperm Whale

The SMX-31 could be the first of a new generation of submarines.

Via Popular Mechanics

Read the Article

[ 2018.11.03 ]

Future Shock in the Countryside

Earth’s rural areas are being transformed by climate change and technology.

By Darran Anderson, for The Atlantic

Read the Essay

[ 2018.11.02 ]

Watch the Futuristic Firestorm of Ghost Cop’s “ACCELERATE”

NYC’s Ghost Cop have just released their latest single “ACCELERATE,” backed with a futuristically stunning video. The track is the first preview of the duo’s long-awaited debut album, ONE WEIRD TRICK, due out November 9th.

Via Post-Punk.com

Watch the Video

[ 2018.11.02 ]

A to Z of The Designers Republic

The Designers Republic is the design group that changed design. But there’s never been a book that tells its story. Until now.

A Kickstarter campaign by Unit Editions.

Learn More

[ 2018.11.01 ]

‘Castlevania’ Renewed For Season 3 On Netflix

Netflix has ordered a 10-episode third season of Castlevania, its dark medieval fantasy based on the classic Konami video game.

Via Deadline Hollywood

Learn More

[ 2018.11.01 ]

Bitcoin: Are we really going to burn up the world for libertarian nerdbucks?

The continued growth of power-hungry Bitcoin could lock in catastrophic climate change, according to a new study.

By Eric Holthaus, for Grist

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.31 ]

“Dark Ritual Ambient” Blends Haunting Music With Spiritual Energy

The concept of “ritual music” continues to the present day, with many artists—particularly in the realms of dark ambient and drone—seeking new ways to combine their haunting sonics with spiritual energy.

Via Bandcamp Daily

Learn More

[ 2018.10.31 ]

R Leporis: A Vampire's Star

The star's discoverer, 19th century English astronomer John Russell Hind, reported that it appeared in a telescope "... like a drop of blood on a black field."

NASA APOD 2018 October 31

Learn More

[ 2018.10.30 ]

Instant Archetypes: A New Tarot For The New Normal

Instant Archetypes is a toolkit to explore the never-ending narratives and multiple perspectives of our new normal: the world of tech-saturated late capitalism.

A Kickstarter campaign conceived by Jon Ardern, Anab Jain and Paul Graham Raven; designed and produced by Superflux; illustrated by Amelie Barnathan

Learn More

[ 2018.10.30 ]

Kepler telescope dead after finding thousands of worlds

The telescope has now gone silent, its fuel tank empty.

Via Phys.org

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.30 ]

Escape Into The World of Geoffroy De Crécy’s Therapeutic Animations

Through robots, animation, illusions, and pools, Geoffroy De Crécy captures the simplicity and beauty of empty places, isolation, and automation like no one else.

Via Gestalten Journal

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.29 ]

The ‘Farmosopher’ Creating Language for Our Climate Doom and Rebirth

Retired professor Glenn A. Albrecht has coined new words to describe the full range of positive and negative emotions we have toward the environment.

By Deidre Olson, for Motherboard

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.29 ]

The world has reached the lowest level of happiness in ten years

World happiness levels are at their lowest level in over a decade, with the number of people who say they feel stressed and worried rising, according to a survey published in September.

By Umberto Bacchi, for World Economic Forum

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.28 ]

Brazil’s Election Is The End Of The Far-Right, Populist Wave. Now We Live With The Results.

On Sunday, far-right evangelical Jair Bolsonaro was elected president of Brazil. The era of being surprised at this kind of politics is over. Now we have to live with what we've done.

By Ryan Broderick, for BuzzFeed News

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.26 ]

How to build a Moon base

Researchers are ramping up plans for living on the Moon.

By Elizabeth Gibney, for Nature

Read the Feature Story

[ 2018.10.24 ]

THE BIG MELTDOWN

As the Antarctic Peninsula heats up, the rules of life there are being ripped apart. Alarmed scientists aren’t sure what all the change means for the future.

By Craig Welch, for National Geographic

Read the Story

[ 2018.10.24 ]

Cixin Liu, China, and the Future of Science Fiction

"Science fiction might be the genre best suited to Chinese society today; the breakneck pace of change becomes a constant, and to live in the present is to anticipate what is to come."

By Amanda DeMarco, for The Paris Review

Read the Essay

[ 2018.10.24 ]

Can Science Fiction Save the World?

James Gunn, the last surviving author of the genre’s Golden Age, believes it can help, anyway. A longtime resident of Lawrence, Kansas, Gunn started writing short stories in 1948…

By Mark Alpert, for Scientific American

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.23 ]

Frozen Hell: The Book That Inspired The Thing

Kickstarter campaign to publish the newly discovered, expanded version of the classic sci-fi story "Who Goes There?" (THE THING) by John W. Campbell, Jr.

Learn More

[ 2018.10.23 ]

InSpace lifts off

The Australian National University has launched its new innovation institute, InSpace, which will bring together technology, science and law research to advance Australia's space industry.

Read the Press Release

[ 2018.10.22 ]

STRATA | ROCK | DUST | STARS

Strata – Rock – Dust – Stars, which showcases ground-breaking moving image, new media and interactive artwork, is inspired by William Smith’s geological map of 1815, which was key in the development of Geology as a science and transformed the way in which we understand the world. Featuring artists: Isaac Julien, Agnes Meyer Brandis, Semiconductor, Phil Coy, Liz Orton, David Jacques, Ryoichi Kurokawa

Visit yorkartgallery.org.uk

[ 2018.10.22 ]

New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space

China is planning to launch its own 'artificial moon' by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported Friday.

Reported by Phys.org

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.22 ]

How Many Space Stations Does This Planet Need?

The Trump administration wants to shift to a capitalist free-for-all in orbit. But the readiness of commercial space outposts to take NASA’s place is far from certain.

By Kenneth Chang, for The New York Times

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.22 ]

International Association of Astronomical Artists

The IAAA is the world’s only guild of artists dedicated to creating images of space. We paint, draw, sculpt, blow glass, and move pixels to show galaxies, stars, planets, moons, anywhere that the imagination can go, but a camera cannot (yet!).

Visit iaaa.org

[ 2018.10.22 ]

Eco-utopia or eco-catastrophe? Imagining California as an ecological utopia

This article explores four California-based eco-utopias: The Earth Abides (George Stewart, 1949), Ecotopia (Ernest Callenbach, 1975), Pacific Edge (Kim Stanley Robinson, 1990), and Snow Crash (Neal Stephenson, 1992), in an attempt to revive eco-utopian visions and learn from them.

By Ronnie D. Lipschutz, for Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.18 ]

Festo BionicWheelBot

Like its biological model, the flic-flac spider, the BionicWheelBot can both walk and roll. Together with its discoverer, Professor Ingo Rechenberg, the Festo bionics team has used these unique movement patterns and turned them into a technical masterpiece for the Hannover Messe 2018.

By Festo HQ, via YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2018.10.18 ]

California’s Neo-psychedelic Music Scene Has Met Its Dream Designer

Andrew McGranahan has cornered the growing market for witchy-sci-fi-collage art.

By Margaret Andersen, for AIGA Eye on Design

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.17 ]

The Revolutionary L5, the Future of Firearm Technology

The "L5" is the world's first functional multi-bore single barrel rifle, and utilizes FDM's caseless ammunition.

FDM Promotional Video, via YouTube

Note: I think I first learned of caseless ammunition reading a William Gibson novel — Virtual Light maybe? — so this caught my attention for that reason.

Watch the Video

[ 2018.10.17 ]

Meet the Endoterrestrials

They live thousands of feet below the Earth’s surface. They eat hydrogen and exhale methane. And they may shape our world more profoundly than we can imagine.

By Douglas Fox, for The Atlantic

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.17 ]

Neon and corporate dystopias: why does cyberpunk refuse to move on?

Repeatedly reproduced and reimagined since the 80s, the tropes of cyberpunk must evolve or die.

By Paul Walker-Emig, for The Guardian

Read the Essay

[ 2018.10.17 ]

Space is the Place: A Crash Course in the Sounds of Afrofuturism

Where the social, political, and technological meet in the music.

By Florence Okoye, for How We Get to Next

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.17 ]

Exploring the Future Beyond Cyberpunk’s Neon and Noir

From Afrofuturism to the New Weird, nine sci-fi subgenres for understanding what’s to come.

By Jay Owens, for How We Get to Next

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.17 ]

Premiere: 'Fractal' Explores the Gender Spectrum in Visually-Stunning Video

OUT speaks with the singer-songwriter Kim Boekbinder about her newest video and how her queer identity, specifically being bisexual and gender nonconforming, influences her music.

By Zachary Zane, for Out

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.16 ]

Humanity is ‘cutting down the tree of life’, warn scientists

Humanity’s ongoing annihilation of wildlife is cutting down the tree of life, including the branch we are sitting on, according to a stark new analysis.

By Damian Carrington, for The Guardian

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.16 ]

UpTown Spot

Hot on the heels of Atlas doing parkour, we now have Boston Dynamics' SpotMini dancing its way into our nightmares.

By Boston Dynamics, via YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2018.10.16 ]

Star Fear Halloween Summer

"I don’t want to go all Dark Mountain here, but if you haven’t noticed by now that we’re all in trouble, then I’m not waiting for you any more."

By Warren Ellis, via MORNING, COMPUTER

Read the Post

[ 2018.10.16 ]

One Thousand Cranes

By Zora Mai Quỳnh, for Terraform

"In one of the most powerful stories I've ever read to be set to the backdrop of climate change, Zora Mai Quỳnh draws on her own experiences as a refugee fleeing her home country of Vietnam to bring our fast-warming future into sharp, crushing relief." —Brian Merchant, Editor of Terraform

Read the Story

[ 2018.10.15 ]

How Capitalism Torched the Planet by Imploding Into Fascism

"Sometimes, when I write scary essays, I encourage you not to read them. This one’s different. It’s going to be brutal, scary, jarring, and alarming. But if you want my thoughts on the future, then read away."

By Umair Haque, for Eudaimonia & Co.

Read the Essay

[ 2018.10.15 ]

‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss

Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A new report suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized.

By Ben Guarino, for The Washington Post

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.15 ]

:echōlot

:echōlot is an ambient audio-reactive light installation, in which imagery compliments the music, providing the viewer with graphic echo feedback.

Created by R▲

Learn More

[ 2018.10.15 ]

Jeff Bezos Wants Us All To Leave Earth — For Good

At Blue Origin, Amazon's space-obsessed founder is building rockets, and he hopes to someday blast humanity into an extraterrestrial future.

By Steven Levy, for Wired

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.15 ]

One New Exoplanet Per Day

Exoplanets imagined daily by designer Patricia Klein.

View @patricia_k_l

[ 2018.10.14 ]

The devastating environmental impact of human progress like you've never seen it before

Photographer Edward Burtynsky is recording humanity's impact on the Earth, one epic-scale photo at a time.

By Nicola Davison, for Wired UK

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.11 ]

Family, world watches as rocket carrying Kansas astronaut fails

In a bar in the small town of Peabody, Kan., in the middle of the night, astronaut Nick Hague’s family huddled around television screens. Family members breathlessly awaited the result of the rocket launch, the culmination of a childhood dream for Hague, a 43-year-old Hoxie native and U.S. Air Force colonel.

By Matt Riedl, for The Wichita Eagle

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.10 ]

Air pollution rots our brains. Is that why we don’t do anything about it?

Human cognitive ability is being damaged not just by CO2 and lead, but the way social media feeds us information, making us shockingly ill-equipped to clean up the air we breathe.

By James Bridle, for The Guardian

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.10 ]

Extinction Symbol

The symbol represents extinction. The circle signifies the planet, while the hourglass inside serves as a warning that time is rapidly running out for many species.

Learn More

[ 2018.10.10 ]

Artists Confront the Radioactive Landscapes of the United States

Hot Spots: Radioactivity and the Landscape at UB Art Galleries in Buffalo examines the nuclear past and future of the United States.

By Allison Meier, for Hyperallergic

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.10 ]

Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem

Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school solving one of the most basic questions in quantum computation: How do you know whether a quantum computer has done anything quantum at all?

By Erica Klarreich, for Quanta Magazine

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.08 ]

IPCC Report: Global Warming of 1.5 °C

An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty.

Read the Report

[ 2018.10.08 ]

Major Climate Report Describes a Strong Risk of Crisis as Early as 2040

A landmark United Nations report paints a far more dire picture of the immediate consequences of climate change than previously thought.

By Coral Davenport, for The New York Times

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.07 ]

Logo Archive

A study of form language in logo design.

Learn More

[ 2018.10.05 ]

Finality

A new web comic created by Warren Ellis and Colleen Doran.

FELICITY ROCKALL was the world’s greatest criminal investigator. She retired at the age of 35 after spending ten years working for international criminal courts. A young agent from the White House’s Intelligence Support Activity, AMY ASH, is reluctantly sent to get her. There’s been a murder, one apparently insoluble, and Rockall’s skills are required one more time.

Read the Comics

[ 2018.10.01 ]

Prehistoric art hints at lost Indian civilisation

The discovery of rock carvings believed to be tens of thousands of years old in India's western state of Maharashtra has greatly excited archaeologists who believe they hold clues to a previously unknown civilisation, BBC Marathi's Mayuresh Konnur reports.

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.27 ]

SCI-Arc Bruce Sterling Lecture

Bruce Sterling lecture on the topics of science fiction, the future, and where architecture may be in 30 years.

Watch the Video

[ 2018.09.26 ]

A marvelous sound machine inspired by a Soviet deep drilling project

Deep in the Arctic Circle, the USSR was drilling deeper into the Earth than anyone before. One artist has combined archaeology and invention to bring its spirit back in sound.

By Peter Kirn, for CDM

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.20 ]

Shell and Exxon's secret 1980s climate change warnings

Newly found documents from the 1980s show that fossil fuel companies privately predicted the global damage that would be caused by their products.

By Benjamin Franta, for The Guardian

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.14 ]

How Will Police Solve Murders on Mars?

Mars P.D. will have to deal with new blood-spatter patterns, different body decay rates, and space-suit sabotage—and they won’t be able to fire guns indoors.

By Geofff Manaugh, for The Atlantic

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.13 ]

Mike Davis on Trump's America

Erratic? Don’t you know that Trump is the instrument of God? He may not be capable of having a sophisticated agenda or even coherent positions on particular issues, but evangelicals, ultra-zionists, the coal industry and military lobbyists certainly do and they are firmly implanted within the administration.

By Mike Davis, for Rebel

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.13 ]

Descend Into Great Britain’s Network of Secret Nuclear Bunkers

They’re no longer in use, having been decommissioned for decades, but they’re a nationwide network of relics of fear—a fear that seems never to have left.

By Kate Ravilious, for Atlas Obscura

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.12 ]

Land of White Alice

1960 film sponsored by Western Electric (AT&T’s equipment manufacturing division), the builder of the USAF’s White Alice Communications System in Alaska. Land of White Alice introduces the people and geography of the new state as well as the Western Electric radio-relay system, which links far-flung military sites, alert stations, and missile-warning facilities.

By Knickerbocker Productions

Watch the Film

[ 2018.09.12 ]

2018 Marsception Competition Winners

Volume Zero has announced winners of the Marsception competition, a challenge to envision a habitat for the first colonizers of Mars. Participants were prompted to consider research conducted within the facility as well as architecture to define a future civilization on Mars.

By Hope Daley, for Archinect News

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.12 ]

Moon Camp

TED-Ed commissioned animation for their lesson about what it might look like if/when we colonize the moon.

By Allen Laseter, on Vimeo

Watch the Video

[ 2011.09.12 ]

Survival of the Richest

The wealthy are plotting to leave us behind.

By Douglas Rushkoff, for Future Human

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.12 ]

Hermetica

A comprehensive library of esoteric symbols, lovingly crafted for design enthusiasts. 750 glyphs for $10.

Designed by Avana Vana

Learn More

[ 2018.09.11 ]

'We Were Guinea Pigs': Soldiers Explain What Nuclear Bomb Blasts Feel Like

"It was as if someone my size had caught fire and walked through me."

By Matthew Gault, for Motherboard

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Isolated Graphics

Isolated graphics, type and illustration. Mostly from government, NGO and private studies and reports.

Curated by Jake Luck, on Instagram

View @isolated._.graphics

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Canada Modern

Canada Modern is a physical and digital archive of Canadian graphic design, with modernism central to its glowing heart.

Visit canadamodern.org

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Brutalist Websites

In its ruggedness and lack of concern to look comfortable or easy, Brutalism can be seen as a reaction by a younger generation to the lightness, optimism, and frivolity of today's web design.

Visit brutalistwebsites.com

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Why Westerners Fear Robots and the Japanese Do Not

The Western concept of '"humanity" is limited, and I think it’s time to seriously question whether we have the right to exploit the environment, animals, tools, or robots simply because we’re human and they are not.

By Joi Ito, for Wired Ideas

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Space Archaeology

"our future is in ruins"

Visit spacearchaeology.org

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Gratitude for Invisible Systems

One way to improve democracy is for more people to appreciate its complex technological underpinnings.

By Debbie Chachra, for The Atlantic

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

While We Remain

The greatest threat that humanity faces from artificial intelligence is not killer robots, but rather, our lack of willingness to analyze, name, and live to the values we want society to have today.

By John C. Havens, for The Wilson Quarterly

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

Los Angeles, America’s Future Spaceport

The city of stars was once a major hub for aerospace. Soon it might be again.

By Geoff Manaugh, for The Atlantic

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

New Mexico’s Sad Bet on Space Exploration

Spaceport America was supposed to bring a thriving space industry to the southern New Mexico desert—but for now it’s a futurist tourist attraction, not an operational harbor to the cosmos.

By Ingrid Burrington, for The Atlantic

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