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[ 2018.11.20 ]

Documenting Hate: New American Nazis

In the wake of the deadly anti-Semitic attack at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, FRONTLINE and ProPublica present a new investigation into white supremacist groups in America – in particular, a neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division, that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military.

Watch the Report

[ 2018.11.20 ]

With disease in shelters and hotels at capacity, wildfire evacuees desperately seek refuge

The most devastating fire in California history began in the Sierra foothills in the morning hours of Nov. 8, prompting a hectic evacuation that has left at least 52,000 people in hotels, relatives’ homes, parking lots and makeshift shelters…

Frances Stead Sellers, Scott Wilson and Tim Craig | The Washington Post

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[ 2018.11.20 ]

THE END OF TRUST (MCSWEENEY’S ISSUE 54)

In our first-ever entirely nonfiction issue of McSweeney’s, The End of Trust (McSweeney’s Issue 54) features more than thirty writers and artists investigating surveillance in the digital age.

Available from The McSweeney’s Store

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[ 2018.11.20 ]

Lab-grown ‘mini brains’ produce electrical patterns that resemble those of premature babies

‘Mini brains’ grown in a dish have spontaneously produced human-like brain waves for the first time — and the electrical patterns look similar to those seen in premature babies. The advancement could help scientists to study early brain development.

Sara Reardon | Nature

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[ 2018.11.20 ]

We Are NASA

We’ve taken giant leaps and left our mark in the heavens. Now we’re building the next chapter, returning to the Moon to stay, and preparing to go beyond. We are NASA – and after 60 years, we’re just getting started.

NASA | via YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2018.11.20 ]

RoboDoc: The Creation of RoboCop

RoboDoc is a brand new feature length documentary from the makers of @uk_leviathan and @frightnightdoc Directed by @Griff_est88

via Twitter @RoboCop_Doc

Watch the Trailer

[ 2018.11.19 ]

NASA picks ancient Martian river delta for 2020 rover touchdown

"The delta is a good place for evidence of life to be deposited and then preserved for the billions of years that have elapsed since this lake was present." —Ken Farley, Mars 2020 project scientist at NASA's JPL

Kerry Sheridan | Phys.org

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

Extinction Rebellion protests block London bridges

Organisers said thousands gathered in central London to demand the government take greater action on climate change.

BBC News

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

The Dystopia is Already Here

"Since people have been asking I thought I'd recap my #dystopia talk at @theuxcrunch from Thursday. The examples used are not what if scenarios. These all happened. #triggerwarning's apply. If you can make it thru to the end I have suggestions for how we can claw back some hope."

Daniel Harvey | via Twitter

View the Thread

[ 2018.11.18 ]

The bodyguard at the end of the world

Steve Braunias resumes his occasional series about preparing for Doomsday with a report on a strange trip to Sydney to interview a New Zealander who claims to be selling million-dollar bunkers and shelters.

Steve Braunias | NZ Herald

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

John W. Campbell, a chief architect of science fiction's Golden Age, was as brilliant as he was problematic

…he went from being one of America’s most prescient futurists to one of its ugliest reactionaries.

Scott Bradfield | Los AngelesTimes

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

We are heading for a New Cretaceous, not for a new normal

…our problem is not confined to post-industrial-era CO2 emissions (global warming, in any case, probably began with forest clearance for early agriculture), but insists that the Holocene was a freakish gift to humanity that we have exploited and taken for granted. We are now assisting at its funeral.

Peter Forbes | Aeon

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[ 2018.11.18 ]

How Extreme Weather Is Shrinking the Planet

With wildfires, heat waves, and rising sea levels, large tracts of the earth are at risk of becoming uninhabitable. But the fossil-fuel industry continues its assault on the facts.

Bill McKibben | The New Yorker

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Air Quality in California: Devastating Fire Leads to a New Danger

The wildfires that have laid waste to vast parts of California are presenting residents with a new danger: air so thick with smoke it ranks among the dirtiest in the world.

Julie Turkewitz and Matt Richtel | The New York Times

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Policies of China, Russia and Canada threaten 5C climate change, study finds

Ranking of countries’ goals shows even EU on course for more than double safe level of warming.

Jonathan Watts | The Guardian

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Robot-soldiers, stealth jets and drone armies: the future of war

The US is racing to devise the next generation of weapons. Will China beat them to it?

Katrina Manson | Financial Times

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

Looking Back on NASA’s Vivid 1970s Visions of Space Living

Feast your peepers on these artistic interpretations of a colonized cosmos.

Evan Nicole Brown | Atlas Obscura

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[ 2018.11.16 ]

How 'miniature suns' could provide cheap, clean energy

We're just five years away from harnessing almost unlimited power from "miniature suns", some start-ups say: nuclear fusion reactors that could provide abundant, cheap and clean energy.

Emma Woollacott | BBC News

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

How Gravity Built the World's Fastest Jet Suit

Richard Browning built the world's fastest personal jet suit. WIRED spoke with him to find out about the design process and engineering of a radical new form of transportation.

Via Wired | The Scene

Watch the Video

[ 2018.11.14 ]

Robert Zemeckis Returns To Science Fiction With ‘Project Blue Book’ & ‘Bios’

On Monday, Zemeckis talked about the two projects: Bios, the upcoming feature film; and Project Blue Book, a television series that premieres in January on History.

Geoff Boucher | Deadline Hollywood

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

AI software helped NASA dream up this spider-like interplanetary lander

Using an AI design process, engineers at software company Autodesk and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory came up with a new interplanetary lander concept that could explore distant moons like Europa and Enceladus.

Loren Grush | The Verge

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

LOW←TECH MAGAZINE

This website is a solar-powered, self-hosted version of Low-tech Magazine. It has been designed to radically reduce the energy use associated with accessing our content.

Visit the Site

[ 2018.11.14 ]

Low-tech Magazine’s Solar-Powered Website is Rewriting the Rules of Web Design

The page is at the whims of the weather—a sunny day allows the website to run at full capacity; rainy days can drain the battery to the point where the page won’t load at all.

Liz Stinson | AIGA Eye on Design

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

Isro’s GSLV-MkIII-D2 rocket places GSAT-29 in orbit

The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) on Wednesday successfully placed another communication satellite in orbit, while also achieving a crucial success of GSLV-MkIII rocket which is slated to launch two big missions—Chandrayaan-2 and the human space mission—in the next four years.

Chethan Kumar, U Tejonmayam | The Times of India

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

Data From a Dead Satellite Reveals Lost Continents Under Antarctica

“These gravity images are revolutionizing our ability to study the least understood continent on Earth—Antarctica.”

Becky Ferreira | Motherboard

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[ 2018.11.14 ]

Researchers Just Turned On the World's Most Powerful Computer Designed to Mimic a Human Brain

Neuromorphic computing just got a big boost with a million-core supercomputer that took over a decade to build.

Daniel Oberhaus | Motherboard

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

Decades after ‘Star Wars,’ Pentagon looks back to the future on missile defense

The Pentagon’s missile defense policy, if it is released, and February budget request could indicate whether the administration intends to advance an effort to put interceptors in space beyond the study stage.

Paul Sonne | The Washington Post

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

This Is What USAF Bomber Pilots Would Wear During a Nuclear Apocalypse

It's an obscure Cold War-era technological relic that's still in use—and becoming increasingly relevant.

Tyler Rogoway | The Drive

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

Where Will Science Take Us? To the Stars

A monthlong visit to observatories in Chile, Hawaii and Los Angeles revealed spellbinding visions of the heavens.

The second of a two-part series on science tourism.

Peter Kujawinski | The New York Times

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

Clandestine: A Limited and Cryptographic Edition

New from Field Notes: The 41st design in our series of Quarterly Editions has a sleek, mysterious look, fitting for an edition all about secret codes and ciphers.

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

Will humanity survive this century? Sir Martin Rees predicts 'a bumpy ride' ahead

"There is the idea that we should despair and evacuate this planet and go somewhere else. That's a dangerous delusion."

An interview with esteemed British astronomer Sir Martin Rees.

Dennis Chow | Mach

Read the Interview

[ 2018.11.13 ]

Burned-Out Cars, Smoke in the Air, Aerial Assaults, All in California

…at every point in the panorama of disaster underway there is a semblance of war — the scenes, the scents, the sounds, the emotions, and even the language of firefighting, of “aerial assaults” and “boots on the ground.”

Tim Arango | The New York Times

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[ 2018.11.13 ]

Sons of the Pre-Apocalypse

My son was born last week, right before two historic wildfires hit California—his new home state—and burned whole cities to the ground.

Brain Merchant | Motherboard

Read the Essay

[ 2018.11.12 ]

Existential nexus: The intersection of technological threats

In this issue, leading experts explore how quickly changing technologies that could pose existential threats to humanity increasingly intersect with one another and, as they do, pose new types of global dangers.

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists | November 2018 Special Issue

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[ 2018.11.12 ]

Our New Age, 1957-1973

Over 15 years, Spilhaus worked with three different artists to make scientific knowledge fun and accessible. Each Sunday comic strip illustrated a recent advance in science or engineering, discussing its implications for how people might live, work or play in the future.

Roger Turner | Picturing Meteorology: Images of Science and History

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[ 2018.11.12 ]

Minnesota Experimental City: the 1960s town based on a comic strip

It had cars on rails, 100% recycling and a nuclear power station in the centre, all covered by a massive dome. So what went wrong with Athelstan Spilhaus’s vision of the future?

Steve Rose | The Guardian

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[ 2018.11.11 ]

Rocket Lab Successfully Launches Its First Commercial Payload Into Orbit

The company’s Electron rocket launched at 4:50 pm local time from the company’s New Zealand launch site on Nov 11, carrying six satellites.

Andy Pasztor | The Wall Street Journal

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[ 2018.11.11 ]

How a Meteor Crash Formed Stunning Desert Glass

Unbeknown to the colliding mountains and swinging apes of the Miocene, the 420,000 square miles that make up the Libyan desert would soon be caramelized into shards of foggy green glass. This rare and precious material, known as Libyan Desert Glass, was found in King Tutankhamun’s burial tomb millions of years later.

Evan Nicole Brown | Atlas Obscura

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[ 2018.11.09 ]

Entire cities evacuate as hellish wildfires whip through California

A trio of rapidly expanding wildfires are burning in California, marking the latest in a string of harrowing climate-related disasters in America.

Eric Holthaus | Grist

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[ 2018.11.09 ]

The Voice of Carl Sagan

We dusted off some of our favorite vintage promo clips Dr. Sagan recorded for The Planetary Society to inspire a generation of members to join us in advancing space science and exploration.

The Planetary Society | via Twitter

View the Thread

[ 2018.11.09 ]

We need to change the way we talk about space exploration

Building a sustainable human presence on other worlds should be open to all. Comparing the journey to violent conquest doesn't help.

An interview with astronomer Lucianne Walkowicz.

Nadia Drake | National Geographic

Read the Interview

[ 2018.11.09 ]

ONE WEIRD TRICK

"ONE WEIRD TRICK is out today! This album is us trying to make sense of the end of the world. Not a polemic, but a process. What it feels like to be haunted by an increasingly uncertain tomorrow, chasing future echoes down the hall. These are the songs you dance to as the clock ticks closer to midnight." —Ghost Cop

Hear the Album on Bandcamp

[ 2018.11.08 ]

Aphex Twin's Mask Collapses

After years of feeding the mystery machine, Richard D. James is offering us more pieces of himself.

Andrew Nosnitsky | Crack Magazine

Read the Interview

[ 2018.11.08 ]

China's state-run Xinhua News Agency debuts 'AI anchor' to read the news

The state-run press agency in China, Xinhua, will now deliver news using "AI anchors" made of digital composites that use synthesized voices to "read" the news.

Via Mashable

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[ 2018.11.07 ]

AIGA Design Futures

This research project examines seven trends shaping the context for the practice of design.

Via AIGA

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[ 2018.11.06 ]

Why we shouldn’t cry ‘aliens’ about that interstellar space rock just yet

What to expect when you’re expecting aliens.

Loren Grush | The Verge

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[ 2018.11.05 ]

E.T., we’re home

Existing laser technology could be fashioned into Earth’s “porch light” to attract alien astronomers, study finds.

Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office

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[ 2018.11.04 ]

The Sub of the Future Is a Drone Mothership Inspired by a Sperm Whale

The SMX-31 could be the first of a new generation of submarines.

Via Popular Mechanics

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[ 2018.11.03 ]

Future Shock in the Countryside

Earth’s rural areas are being transformed by climate change and technology.

By Darran Anderson, for The Atlantic

Read the Essay

[ 2018.11.02 ]

Watch the Futuristic Firestorm of Ghost Cop’s “ACCELERATE”

NYC’s Ghost Cop have just released their latest single “ACCELERATE,” backed with a futuristically stunning video. The track is the first preview of the duo’s long-awaited debut album, ONE WEIRD TRICK, due out November 9th.

Via Post-Punk.com

Watch the Video

[ 2018.11.02 ]

A to Z of The Designers Republic

The Designers Republic is the design group that changed design. But there’s never been a book that tells its story. Until now.

A Kickstarter campaign by Unit Editions.

Learn More

[ 2018.11.01 ]

‘Castlevania’ Renewed For Season 3 On Netflix

Netflix has ordered a 10-episode third season of Castlevania, its dark medieval fantasy based on the classic Konami video game.

Via Deadline Hollywood

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[ 2018.11.01 ]

Bitcoin: Are we really going to burn up the world for libertarian nerdbucks?

The continued growth of power-hungry Bitcoin could lock in catastrophic climate change, according to a new study.

By Eric Holthaus, for Grist

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[ 2018.10.31 ]

“Dark Ritual Ambient” Blends Haunting Music With Spiritual Energy

The concept of “ritual music” continues to the present day, with many artists—particularly in the realms of dark ambient and drone—seeking new ways to combine their haunting sonics with spiritual energy.

Via Bandcamp Daily

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[ 2018.10.31 ]

R Leporis: A Vampire's Star

The star's discoverer, 19th century English astronomer John Russell Hind, reported that it appeared in a telescope "... like a drop of blood on a black field."

NASA APOD 2018 October 31

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[ 2018.10.30 ]

Instant Archetypes: A New Tarot For The New Normal

Instant Archetypes is a toolkit to explore the never-ending narratives and multiple perspectives of our new normal: the world of tech-saturated late capitalism.

A Kickstarter campaign conceived by Jon Ardern, Anab Jain and Paul Graham Raven; designed and produced by Superflux; illustrated by Amelie Barnathan

Learn More

[ 2018.10.30 ]

Kepler telescope dead after finding thousands of worlds

The telescope has now gone silent, its fuel tank empty.

Via Phys.org

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[ 2018.10.30 ]

Escape Into The World of Geoffroy De Crécy’s Therapeutic Animations

Through robots, animation, illusions, and pools, Geoffroy De Crécy captures the simplicity and beauty of empty places, isolation, and automation like no one else.

Via Gestalten Journal

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.29 ]

The ‘Farmosopher’ Creating Language for Our Climate Doom and Rebirth

Retired professor Glenn A. Albrecht has coined new words to describe the full range of positive and negative emotions we have toward the environment.

By Deidre Olson, for Motherboard

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[ 2018.10.29 ]

The world has reached the lowest level of happiness in ten years

World happiness levels are at their lowest level in over a decade, with the number of people who say they feel stressed and worried rising, according to a survey published in September.

By Umberto Bacchi, for World Economic Forum

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.28 ]

Brazil’s Election Is The End Of The Far-Right, Populist Wave. Now We Live With The Results.

On Sunday, far-right evangelical Jair Bolsonaro was elected president of Brazil. The era of being surprised at this kind of politics is over. Now we have to live with what we've done.

By Ryan Broderick, for BuzzFeed News

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[ 2018.10.26 ]

How to build a Moon base

Researchers are ramping up plans for living on the Moon.

By Elizabeth Gibney, for Nature

Read the Feature Story

[ 2018.10.24 ]

THE BIG MELTDOWN

As the Antarctic Peninsula heats up, the rules of life there are being ripped apart. Alarmed scientists aren’t sure what all the change means for the future.

By Craig Welch, for National Geographic

Read the Story

[ 2018.10.24 ]

Cixin Liu, China, and the Future of Science Fiction

"Science fiction might be the genre best suited to Chinese society today; the breakneck pace of change becomes a constant, and to live in the present is to anticipate what is to come."

By Amanda DeMarco, for The Paris Review

Read the Essay

[ 2018.10.24 ]

Can Science Fiction Save the World?

James Gunn, the last surviving author of the genre’s Golden Age, believes it can help, anyway. A longtime resident of Lawrence, Kansas, Gunn started writing short stories in 1948…

By Mark Alpert, for Scientific American

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[ 2018.10.23 ]

Frozen Hell: The Book That Inspired The Thing

Kickstarter campaign to publish the newly discovered, expanded version of the classic sci-fi story "Who Goes There?" (THE THING) by John W. Campbell, Jr.

Learn More

[ 2018.10.23 ]

InSpace lifts off

The Australian National University has launched its new innovation institute, InSpace, which will bring together technology, science and law research to advance Australia's space industry.

Read the Press Release

[ 2018.10.22 ]

STRATA | ROCK | DUST | STARS

Strata – Rock – Dust – Stars, which showcases ground-breaking moving image, new media and interactive artwork, is inspired by William Smith’s geological map of 1815, which was key in the development of Geology as a science and transformed the way in which we understand the world. Featuring artists: Isaac Julien, Agnes Meyer Brandis, Semiconductor, Phil Coy, Liz Orton, David Jacques, Ryoichi Kurokawa

Visit yorkartgallery.org.uk

[ 2018.10.22 ]

New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space

China is planning to launch its own 'artificial moon' by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported Friday.

Reported by Phys.org

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.22 ]

How Many Space Stations Does This Planet Need?

The Trump administration wants to shift to a capitalist free-for-all in orbit. But the readiness of commercial space outposts to take NASA’s place is far from certain.

By Kenneth Chang, for The New York Times

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[ 2018.10.22 ]

International Association of Astronomical Artists

The IAAA is the world’s only guild of artists dedicated to creating images of space. We paint, draw, sculpt, blow glass, and move pixels to show galaxies, stars, planets, moons, anywhere that the imagination can go, but a camera cannot (yet!).

Visit iaaa.org

[ 2018.10.22 ]

Eco-utopia or eco-catastrophe? Imagining California as an ecological utopia

This article explores four California-based eco-utopias: The Earth Abides (George Stewart, 1949), Ecotopia (Ernest Callenbach, 1975), Pacific Edge (Kim Stanley Robinson, 1990), and Snow Crash (Neal Stephenson, 1992), in an attempt to revive eco-utopian visions and learn from them.

By Ronnie D. Lipschutz, for Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

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[ 2018.10.18 ]

Festo BionicWheelBot

Like its biological model, the flic-flac spider, the BionicWheelBot can both walk and roll. Together with its discoverer, Professor Ingo Rechenberg, the Festo bionics team has used these unique movement patterns and turned them into a technical masterpiece for the Hannover Messe 2018.

By Festo HQ, via YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2018.10.18 ]

California’s Neo-psychedelic Music Scene Has Met Its Dream Designer

Andrew McGranahan has cornered the growing market for witchy-sci-fi-collage art.

By Margaret Andersen, for AIGA Eye on Design

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[ 2018.10.17 ]

The Revolutionary L5, the Future of Firearm Technology

The "L5" is the world's first functional multi-bore single barrel rifle, and utilizes FDM's caseless ammunition.

FDM Promotional Video, via YouTube

Note: I think I first learned of caseless ammunition reading a William Gibson novel — Virtual Light maybe? — so this caught my attention for that reason.

Watch the Video

[ 2018.10.17 ]

Meet the Endoterrestrials

They live thousands of feet below the Earth’s surface. They eat hydrogen and exhale methane. And they may shape our world more profoundly than we can imagine.

By Douglas Fox, for The Atlantic

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[ 2018.10.17 ]

Neon and corporate dystopias: why does cyberpunk refuse to move on?

Repeatedly reproduced and reimagined since the 80s, the tropes of cyberpunk must evolve or die.

By Paul Walker-Emig, for The Guardian

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[ 2018.10.17 ]

Space is the Place: A Crash Course in the Sounds of Afrofuturism

Where the social, political, and technological meet in the music.

By Florence Okoye, for How We Get to Next

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[ 2018.10.17 ]

Exploring the Future Beyond Cyberpunk’s Neon and Noir

From Afrofuturism to the New Weird, nine sci-fi subgenres for understanding what’s to come.

By Jay Owens, for How We Get to Next

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[ 2018.10.17 ]

Premiere: 'Fractal' Explores the Gender Spectrum in Visually-Stunning Video

OUT speaks with the singer-songwriter Kim Boekbinder about her newest video and how her queer identity, specifically being bisexual and gender nonconforming, influences her music.

By Zachary Zane, for Out

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[ 2018.10.16 ]

Humanity is ‘cutting down the tree of life’, warn scientists

Humanity’s ongoing annihilation of wildlife is cutting down the tree of life, including the branch we are sitting on, according to a stark new analysis.

By Damian Carrington, for The Guardian

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[ 2018.10.16 ]

UpTown Spot

Hot on the heels of Atlas doing parkour, we now have Boston Dynamics' SpotMini dancing its way into our nightmares.

By Boston Dynamics, via YouTube

Watch the Video

[ 2018.10.16 ]

Star Fear Halloween Summer

"I don’t want to go all Dark Mountain here, but if you haven’t noticed by now that we’re all in trouble, then I’m not waiting for you any more."

By Warren Ellis, via MORNING, COMPUTER

Read the Post

[ 2018.10.16 ]

One Thousand Cranes

By Zora Mai Quỳnh, for Terraform

"In one of the most powerful stories I've ever read to be set to the backdrop of climate change, Zora Mai Quỳnh draws on her own experiences as a refugee fleeing her home country of Vietnam to bring our fast-warming future into sharp, crushing relief." —Brian Merchant, Editor of Terraform

Read the Story

[ 2018.10.15 ]

How Capitalism Torched the Planet by Imploding Into Fascism

"Sometimes, when I write scary essays, I encourage you not to read them. This one’s different. It’s going to be brutal, scary, jarring, and alarming. But if you want my thoughts on the future, then read away."

By Umair Haque, for Eudaimonia & Co.

Read the Essay

[ 2018.10.15 ]

‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss

Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A new report suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized.

By Ben Guarino, for The Washington Post

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[ 2018.10.15 ]

:echōlot

:echōlot is an ambient audio-reactive light installation, in which imagery compliments the music, providing the viewer with graphic echo feedback.

Created by R▲

Learn More

[ 2018.10.15 ]

Jeff Bezos Wants Us All To Leave Earth — For Good

At Blue Origin, Amazon's space-obsessed founder is building rockets, and he hopes to someday blast humanity into an extraterrestrial future.

By Steven Levy, for Wired

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.15 ]

One New Exoplanet Per Day

Exoplanets imagined daily by designer Patricia Klein.

View @patricia_k_l

[ 2018.10.14 ]

The devastating environmental impact of human progress like you've never seen it before

Photographer Edward Burtynsky is recording humanity's impact on the Earth, one epic-scale photo at a time.

By Nicola Davison, for Wired UK

Read the Article

[ 2018.10.11 ]

Family, world watches as rocket carrying Kansas astronaut fails

In a bar in the small town of Peabody, Kan., in the middle of the night, astronaut Nick Hague’s family huddled around television screens. Family members breathlessly awaited the result of the rocket launch, the culmination of a childhood dream for Hague, a 43-year-old Hoxie native and U.S. Air Force colonel.

By Matt Riedl, for The Wichita Eagle

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[ 2018.10.10 ]

Air pollution rots our brains. Is that why we don’t do anything about it?

Human cognitive ability is being damaged not just by CO2 and lead, but the way social media feeds us information, making us shockingly ill-equipped to clean up the air we breathe.

By James Bridle, for The Guardian

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[ 2018.10.10 ]

Extinction Symbol

The symbol represents extinction. The circle signifies the planet, while the hourglass inside serves as a warning that time is rapidly running out for many species.

Learn More

[ 2018.10.10 ]

Artists Confront the Radioactive Landscapes of the United States

Hot Spots: Radioactivity and the Landscape at UB Art Galleries in Buffalo examines the nuclear past and future of the United States.

By Allison Meier, for Hyperallergic

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[ 2018.10.10 ]

Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem

Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school solving one of the most basic questions in quantum computation: How do you know whether a quantum computer has done anything quantum at all?

By Erica Klarreich, for Quanta Magazine

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[ 2018.10.08 ]

IPCC Report: Global Warming of 1.5 °C

An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty.

Read the Report

[ 2018.10.08 ]

Major Climate Report Describes a Strong Risk of Crisis as Early as 2040

A landmark United Nations report paints a far more dire picture of the immediate consequences of climate change than previously thought.

By Coral Davenport, for The New York Times

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[ 2018.10.07 ]

Logo Archive

A study of form language in logo design.

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[ 2018.10.05 ]

Finality

A new web comic created by Warren Ellis and Colleen Doran.

FELICITY ROCKALL was the world’s greatest criminal investigator. She retired at the age of 35 after spending ten years working for international criminal courts. A young agent from the White House’s Intelligence Support Activity, AMY ASH, is reluctantly sent to get her. There’s been a murder, one apparently insoluble, and Rockall’s skills are required one more time.

Read the Comics

[ 2018.10.01 ]

Prehistoric art hints at lost Indian civilisation

The discovery of rock carvings believed to be tens of thousands of years old in India's western state of Maharashtra has greatly excited archaeologists who believe they hold clues to a previously unknown civilisation, BBC Marathi's Mayuresh Konnur reports.

Read the Article

[ 2018.09.27 ]

SCI-Arc Bruce Sterling Lecture

Bruce Sterling lecture on the topics of science fiction, the future, and where architecture may be in 30 years.

Watch the Video

[ 2018.09.26 ]

A marvelous sound machine inspired by a Soviet deep drilling project

Deep in the Arctic Circle, the USSR was drilling deeper into the Earth than anyone before. One artist has combined archaeology and invention to bring its spirit back in sound.

By Peter Kirn, for CDM

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[ 2018.09.20 ]

Shell and Exxon's secret 1980s climate change warnings

Newly found documents from the 1980s show that fossil fuel companies privately predicted the global damage that would be caused by their products.

By Benjamin Franta, for The Guardian

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[ 2018.09.14 ]

How Will Police Solve Murders on Mars?

Mars P.D. will have to deal with new blood-spatter patterns, different body decay rates, and space-suit sabotage—and they won’t be able to fire guns indoors.

By Geofff Manaugh, for The Atlantic

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[ 2018.09.13 ]

Mike Davis on Trump's America

Erratic? Don’t you know that Trump is the instrument of God? He may not be capable of having a sophisticated agenda or even coherent positions on particular issues, but evangelicals, ultra-zionists, the coal industry and military lobbyists certainly do and they are firmly implanted within the administration.

By Mike Davis, for Rebel

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[ 2018.09.13 ]

Descend Into Great Britain’s Network of Secret Nuclear Bunkers

They’re no longer in use, having been decommissioned for decades, but they’re a nationwide network of relics of fear—a fear that seems never to have left.

By Kate Ravilious, for Atlas Obscura

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[ 2018.09.12 ]

Land of White Alice

1960 film sponsored by Western Electric (AT&T’s equipment manufacturing division), the builder of the USAF’s White Alice Communications System in Alaska. Land of White Alice introduces the people and geography of the new state as well as the Western Electric radio-relay system, which links far-flung military sites, alert stations, and missile-warning facilities.

By Knickerbocker Productions

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[ 2018.09.12 ]

2018 Marsception Competition Winners

Volume Zero has announced winners of the Marsception competition, a challenge to envision a habitat for the first colonizers of Mars. Participants were prompted to consider research conducted within the facility as well as architecture to define a future civilization on Mars.

By Hope Daley, for Archinect News

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[ 2018.09.12 ]

Moon Camp

TED-Ed commissioned animation for their lesson about what it might look like if/when we colonize the moon.

By Allen Laseter, on Vimeo

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[ 2011.09.12 ]

Survival of the Richest

The wealthy are plotting to leave us behind.

By Douglas Rushkoff, for Future Human

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[ 2018.09.12 ]

Hermetica

A comprehensive library of esoteric symbols, lovingly crafted for design enthusiasts. 750 glyphs for $10.

Designed by Avana Vana

Learn More

[ 2018.09.11 ]

'We Were Guinea Pigs': Soldiers Explain What Nuclear Bomb Blasts Feel Like

"It was as if someone my size had caught fire and walked through me."

By Matthew Gault, for Motherboard

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

Isolated Graphics

Isolated graphics, type and illustration. Mostly from government, NGO and private studies and reports.

Curated by Jake Luck, on Instagram

View @isolated._.graphics

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Canada Modern

Canada Modern is a physical and digital archive of Canadian graphic design, with modernism central to its glowing heart.

Visit canadamodern.org

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Brutalist Websites

In its ruggedness and lack of concern to look comfortable or easy, Brutalism can be seen as a reaction by a younger generation to the lightness, optimism, and frivolity of today's web design.

Visit brutalistwebsites.com

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Why Westerners Fear Robots and the Japanese Do Not

The Western concept of '"humanity" is limited, and I think it’s time to seriously question whether we have the right to exploit the environment, animals, tools, or robots simply because we’re human and they are not.

By Joi Ito, for Wired Ideas

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

Space Archaeology

"our future is in ruins"

Visit spacearchaeology.org

[ 2018.09.11 ]

Gratitude for Invisible Systems

One way to improve democracy is for more people to appreciate its complex technological underpinnings.

By Debbie Chachra, for The Atlantic

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

While We Remain

The greatest threat that humanity faces from artificial intelligence is not killer robots, but rather, our lack of willingness to analyze, name, and live to the values we want society to have today.

By John C. Havens, for The Wilson Quarterly

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

Los Angeles, America’s Future Spaceport

The city of stars was once a major hub for aerospace. Soon it might be again.

By Geoff Manaugh, for The Atlantic

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[ 2018.09.11 ]

New Mexico’s Sad Bet on Space Exploration

Spaceport America was supposed to bring a thriving space industry to the southern New Mexico desert—but for now it’s a futurist tourist attraction, not an operational harbor to the cosmos.

By Ingrid Burrington, for The Atlantic

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